Are you the publisher? Claim or contact us about this channel


Embed this content in your HTML

Search

Report adult content:

click to rate:

Account: (login)

More Channels


Channel Catalog


Articles on this Page

(showing articles 1 to 50 of 50)
(showing articles 1 to 50 of 50)

    0 0

    The bright blue plywood and galvanized metal decor of Vancouver's Kin Kao, designed by local architects (and Remodelista favorites) David and Susan Scott of Scott & Scott Architects, is a perfect match for chef Tang Phoonchai's upstart Thai menu: Street food comes inside to a warm welcome.

    Photography by Scott & Scott Architects, unless otherwise noted.

    Scott and Scott Architects, Kin Kao Thai Kitchen | Remodelista

    Above: Scott & Scott Architects designed the 25-seat restaurant using economical and readily available materials, such as stained plywood, painted concrete, soaped beech, and galvanized metal. "We were trying to balance looks and durability," says David. "The beech [counter, chairs, and table], for instance, will age comfortably and can be easily refinished over the restaurant's life."

    Scott and Scott Architects, Kin Kao Thai Kitchen, Photograph by Stephen Wilde | Remodelista

    Above: Open storage behind the bar provides easy access to tableware. Large windows draw in light, and at night the space is illuminated by linear pendant fixtures. Photograph by Stephen Wilde.

    Scott and Scott Architects, Kin Kao Thai Kitchen, Photograph by Stephen Wilde | Remodelista

    Above: The architects designed the lights and fabricated them in their studio. "We started with a design that utilized beech at the ends only, but when we received the full-length dowels from the wood turner, we couldn't bring ourselves to cut them into short chunks." Photograph by Stephen Wilde.

    Scott and Scott Architects, Kin Kao Thai Kitchen, Photograph by Stephen Wilde | Remodelista

    Above: Stackable Beech Copenhague Chairs by Ronan and Erwan Bouroullec for Hay are paired with beech and metal tables designed by the architects. Photograph by Stephen Wilde.

    Scott and Scott Architects, Kin Kao Thai Kitchen, Photograph by Stephen Wilde | Remodelista

    Above: Made with local ingredients, Phoonchai's street-food and home-style dishes take center stage against white tableware. Photograph by Stephen Wilde.

    Scott and Scott Architects, Kin Kao Thai Kitchen, Photograph by Stephen Wilde | Remodelista

    Above: Situated at the back of a nondescript strip mall, Kin Kao, it's hoped, will serve a community of shop workers and employees from local manufacturing and commercial businesses. Photograph by Stephen Wilde.

    Scott and Scott Architects, Kin Kao Thai Kitchen | Remodelista

    Above: The custom cerulean blue concrete floor is tinted with a commercial acrylic paint from Vancouver's General Paint. "We honed in on the exact blue by trying out a number of samples," says David. "We like this one because it resonates with the natural light in the space."

    Scott and Scott Architects, Kin Kao Thai Kitchen | Remodelista

    Above: The bar is made of construction-grade Douglas fir plywood washed with a thinned application of the blue floor paint. 

    Scott and Scott Architects, Kin Kao Thai Kitchen | Remodelista

    Above: The service area walls are finished with galvanized panels for easy maintenance. They act as a magnet board for hanging the daily specials.

    Scott and Scott Architects, Kin Kao Thai Kitchen | Remodelista

    Above: The grain of the plywood is visible through the wash of floor paint.

    Scott and Scott Architects, Kin Kao Thai Kitchen | Remodelista

    Above: Beech Copenhague Bar Stools by Ronan and Erwan Bouroullec for Hay stand out against the blue background. 

    Protrait of Tang Phoonchai of Kin Kao Thai Kitchen, Photograph by Stephen Wilde | Remodelista

    Above: Chef Tang Phoonchai is originally from Bangkok and draws heavily on the food of his childhood. Photograph by Stephen Wilde.

    Scott and Scott Architects, Kin Kao Thai Kitchen | Remodelista

    Above L: An axonometric drawing of the restaurant. Above R: The plan illustrates the dining area's flexible table and seating setup, which allows the room to be used for small seatings or reconfigured for communal meals. 

    For more places to visit in Vancouver and beyond, browse our City Guide gallery.  And don't miss our posts on David and Susan Scott's own Off-the-Grid Cabin and another of their restaurant designs, Bestie Currywurst in Vancouver's Chinatown.

    More Stories from Remodelista


      0 0

      After decamping from London for life in the country, designer-maker Rupert McKelvie established Out of the Valley, his Devon, England, workshop devoted to building sustainable, off-the-grid, "efficient yet aesthetic" cabins. His model design on the banks of the River Teign happens to be available for rent by the night.

      Photography via Out of the Valley.

      Off-the-grid rental cabin in Devon, England by Out of the Valley | Remodelista

      Above: McKelvie's little cabin in the woods is solar powered and perfectly sized for two. It has a shou sugi ban exterior—read about the Japanese technique in Torched Lumber

      Trained as a classical wood boat builder, 31-year-old McKelvie went on to study 3-D design and sustainability at Falmouth University and then worked in London as a product and furniture designer. He moved to Devon to start his own practice with a focus on off-the-grid living.

      Off-the-grid rental cabin in Devon, England, designed by Rupert Mckelvie of Out of the Valley, makers of bespoke cabins and furniture | Remodelista

      Above: The oak deck is furnished with Net Chairs by Mark Product of Cornwall and a McKelvie burned-wood table inspired by a Kaspar Hamacher design: "After seeing it, I wanted to have a go at making one."

      Above: The deck has a canvas shade stitched by a sailmaker and a corrugated black metal roof (see more on metal roofs here). The cabin is heated by woodstove and has solar-powered lighting.

      Above: A king-size bed is tucked into an alcove off the open living space. The kitchen comes complete with cooker and gas hob. "For the next cabin, I'd like to incorporate gray water recycling and not use any gas," says McKelvie.

      Out of the Valley's off-the-grid rental cabin in Devon, England | Remodelista

      Above: All the furniture and built-ins are McKelvie's own designs in ash and oak, which he and his small crew fabricate (and make on commission). "I wanted to use a minimal material and color palette, three at most," says McKelvie. "Less is so much more when it comes to the architecture of small spaces; each material allows the next to have room to breathe." (For more tips, go to Expert Advice: 11 Tips for Making a Room Look Bigger.)

      The wood print over the banquette is made from an ash tree on the property felled in a storm. It's by McKelvie's friend illustrator Bea Forshall. The conical wood hanging lights are by Secto Design of Finland.

      Above: A sliding door off the kitchen opens to the compact bathroom. The glass-and-concrete Leimu table lamp is by London-based designer Magnus Pettersen for Iittala.

      Above: The bathroom is detailed with Carrara marble tiles and has a brass monsoon showerhead (plus a compost toilet).

      Above: The sink is kitted out with reconditioned old brass taps. (If you're looking to source your own old-fashioned hot-and-cold spouts, see Objects Lessons: The British Cloakroom Basin Tap.)

      Above: At last week's Clerkenwell Design Week in London, McKelvie launched Out of the Valley's first furniture collection, which includes cabin-inspired sinks with surface-mounted copper pipes and vintage taps.

      Off-the-grid rental cabin in Devon, England by Out of the Valley | Remodelista

      Above: The cabin overlooks a former farm field that slopes down to the river, where guests can fly-fish and skinny-dip. Bluebells and foxgloves bloom around the property in early summer, and McElvie reports seeing wagtails, wood warblers, herons, and kingfishers near the water.

      Above: The field is surrounded by National Trust woodland.

      Above: Stargazing from the deck is the main nighttime activity. 

      The Out of the Valley cabin rents for £130 ($193) to £160 ($237.63) per night, depending on the season. It's located on the northern edge of Dartmoor in Devon's Teign Valley. Two castles—Drogo and Bovey—are nearby, as is the Devon coast.

      Explore more cabins in the woods in our Outbuildings of the Week posts, including a Tree Cocoon.

      For more examples of shou sugi ban, see:

      More Stories from Remodelista


        0 0
      • 05/25/15--10:15: Westward Ho in Seattle
      • Channeling Wes Anderson’s The Life Aquatic mixed with a dash of vintage yacht club, chef Josh Henderson and designer Matthew Parker of the Huxley Wallace Collective have created Westward, a restaurant and oyster bar on Seattle's Lake Union with views across the water to downtown. The duo relied on a coterie of local designers to finesse the nautical notes. 

        Westward-restaurant-Seattle-Remodelista

        Abvoe: The 25-feet-bar was created from a slice of a ship and anchors (no pun intended) the restaurant. Created by local art fabricators Electric Coffin, several of the compartments are crafted into a quirky diorama. The drum lighting shades are made of recycled sailcloth, and the white ceramic lights in the shape of buoys are from local firm Fleet Objects

        Westward restaurant Seattle | Remodelista

        Above: Restaurant staff wear St. James boat shirts and other marine attire.

        Westward Restaurant Seattle | Remodelista

        Above: The food served is Northwest-meets-the-Med.

        Westward Restaurant & Little Gull Seattle | Remodelista

        Above: In the oyster bar, pilings are used as pillars with brightly painted cleats for hanging coats.

        Westward Restaurant & Little Gull Seattle | Remodelista

        Above: The Little Gull Grocery in the oyster bar has shelving suspended by rope.

        Westward Restaurant & Little Gull Seattle | Remodelista

        Above: Strung rope serves as a screen of sorts.

        Westward Restaurant & Little Gull Seattle | Remodelista

        Above: Portraits of various captains in history decorate the restaurant (Captain Kirk and Bill Murray as Captain Steve Zissou, included).

        Westward Restaurant & Little Gull Seattle | Remodelista

        Above: Adirondack chairs line the shore of Lake Union, and diners gather around a large fire pit surrounded by a ring of oyster shells. Downtown Seattle rises in the distance.  

        Westward Restaurant Seattle nautical ropes | Remodelista

        Above: Nautical rope is used as outside decor.

        Westward Restaurant in Seattle | Remodelista

        Above: The restaurant has a 150-foot dock for boaters to drop by.

        Inspired by the maritime look? See our Steal This Look on another Seattle favorite, The Walrus and the Carpenter.  For more of our Seattle stops, consult our City Guide. And take a look at life on nearby Bainbridge Island in The New Homesteaders.

        For design new, tips, and tricks, sign up to receive the daily Remodelista newsletter

        More Stories from Remodelista


          0 0

          Almost exactly two years ago, Magnus Ek and Agneta Green opened Oaxen Krog & Slip, their twin restaurants on the island of Djurgården in the center of Stockholm. Since then, both establishments have won awards for food and design: Krog is, as of February, a Michelin two-starred dining room, and Slip, a casual bistro (and Bib Gourmand pick, Michelin's designation for standout value). Both establishments specialize in locally sourced and seasonal Nordic cooking. 

          The couple's adventures in the food world began 17 years ago at Oaxen Krog, a small restaurant on the island of Oaxen in Stockholm’s archipelago. Magnus ran the kitchen and Agneta was a waitress (and later got her sommelier certification). They served inventive dishes using island produce and herbs, and together created a menu and an ambiance that brought guests from near and far to experience one of Sweden's most sophisticated restaurants.

          The island's harsh weather, however, kept Oaxen Krog closed for much of the year, and so Magnus and Agneta decided to relocate closer to Stockholm. Their search for a site eventually led them to Gamla Djurgårdsvarvet, a crumbling shipyard on the island of Djurgården. With the help of architect Mats Fahlander, interior designer/architect Agneta Pettersson, and general contractor Einar Mattsson, they entirely rebuilt the shipyard, constructing the new on the footprint of the old—and seeing to it that the nautical spirit remains intact.

          Photography by Lindman Photography, unless noted. 

          Oaxen Restaurant Exterior I Remodelista

          Above: The Oaxen Krog & Slip is housed inside a new corrugated metal building. A 30-foot-tall wall-to-wall window faces the marina. The exterior and interior were given a shipyard appearance. 

          Oaxen Restaurant Exterior I Remodelista

          Above: The exterior is painted a bright yellow.

          Oaxen Restaurant in Stockholm I Remodelista

          Above: The interior of Slip, also known as the bistro, is filled with marine references, including boats hanging from the rafters. The turquoise-bottomed Tova, a Swedish wooden craft called a plymsnäcka, was built in 1905; the single scull at the restaurant's far end dates to 1920. Pettersson detailed the space with vintage furniture, porcelain, cutlery, and accessories. The community tables are old school desks from southern Sweden; the chairs come from a theater and are fixed to the floor. 

          Oaxen Restaurant in Stockholm I Remodelista

          Above: The table settings are simple and informal. The bar stools date to the 1920s and were sourced from a Copenhagen restaurant. The angled wall lights are vintage Triplex lamps by Johan Petter Johansson.

          Oaxen Restaurant in Stockholm I Remodelista

          Above: At one end of the Slip, a red leather sofa made for the dining room of a food supply company stands against a white corrugated metal wall. Vintage Thonet bentwood chairs are matched with Roll Tables by Tom Dixon that have cast-iron bases with wheels. The hanging industrial pendant lamps are from the 1950s. 

          Oaxen Restaurant in Stockholm I Remodelista 

          Above: The wooden stairs have a cube-like pattern and a steel railing designed by Fahlander. Photograph via Oaxen.

          Oaxen Restaurant in Stockholm I Remodelista

          Above: Oaxen Krog, the more formal dining room, seats 35 and serves six- and 10-course menus paired with wines from small European ecological vineyards. All ingredients are sourced in Scandinavia and during the summer season, the kitchen staff picks wild herbs and plants on Djurgården island. 

          Oaxen Restaurant in Stockholm I Remodelista

          Above: The dining room walls and ceiling are covered in slatted oak panels. The built-in sofa is made of oak and leather. Local shipyard carpenters fabricated the custom tables, which are paired with a 1950s chair design that's still in production by Swedish furniture maker Wigells. Socket lamps hang from fabric cords over the tables.

          Oaxen Restaurant in Stockholm I Remodelista

          Above: The Club Room, located above the restaurant, offers private events and dinners—and impressive views from a balcony of Saltsjön Bay and the island of Beckholmen. The paneled walls and ceiling are painted in a linseed oil and the glass ceiling lamps are by Massimo Vignelli for Venini. The chairs are Arne Jacobsen's Grand Prix design for Fritz Hansen, first introduced in 1957.

          Oaxen Restaurant Bathroom I Remodelista

          Above: The white-and-black-tiled bathroom has an industrial feel. It's detailed with classic porcelain Belfast sinks and faucets made from exposed copper piping. The tiles are handmade by Spanish company Decorativa

          Oaxen Prince Van Orangien Hotel Boat I Remodelista 
          Above: Owners Magnus and Agneta also operate a hotel ship called the Prince van Orangiën. It was built in 1935 in Holland as a combination home and office for its original owner. Photograph via Oaxen.

          Oaxen Prince Van Orangien Hotel Boat Cabin Room I Remodelista

          Above: The newly renovated ship has six guest cabins and is moored off Beckholmen island, a short distance from the restaurant. For more information and reservations, go to Oaxen Krog & Slip. Photograph via Oaxen. 

          Check out our Stockholm City Guide for more visit-worthy places, including Restaurant Museet (which has its own Siberian tiger). Gardenista takes you to one of Stockholm's most beautiful flower shops: Landet Järna. And for a place to stay, consider the Miss Clara and Ett Hem hotels.

          For design new, tips, and tricks, sign up to receive the daily Remodelista newsletter

          This post is an update. It originally ran on June 23, 2014, as part of our Life Aquatic issue.

          More Stories from Remodelista


            0 0

            Andrew Glenn and Jonathan Rutherfurd Best are two Brits who, fed up with their careers in marketing and event management, escaped to Waiheke Island in New Zealand to open a boutique hotel.

            Glenn and Best enlisted the help of stylist and designer Katie Lockhart for the interiors and Special Group for graphics and branding. The result is the Oyster Inn, made up of just three guest rooms, a restaurant that seats 80, and a beach boutique. True to form, Lockhart's calm and minimalist interiors highlight some of our shared favorite designers, including furniture by Another Country and Falcon Enamelware in the guest rooms.

            Oyster Inn in New Zealand, Designed by Katie Lochkart, Remodelista

            Above: The 80-seat restaurant offers veranda dining under the shade of surrounding palms, where worn metal chairs give a sense of the saltwater air of the island.

            Oyster Inn in New Zealand, Designed by Katie Lochkart, Remodelista

            Above: Lockhart opted for cane seating in the main dining room with vintage Thonet Era Chairs and a few shelves displaying groupings of objects sourced from the sea: abalone shells, white coral, and seaweed.

            Oyster Inn in New Zealand, Designed by Katie Lochkart, Remodelista

            Above: Era Barstools surround the bar where guests of the inn and wanderers from beyond can find sangria, lemonade, and a selection of wine chosen by sommelier Clare Dunleavy.

            Oyster Inn in New Zealand, Designed by Katie Lochkart, Remodelista

            Above: A 20-seat private room called The Pearl is available for special events catered by chef Cristian Hossack (former head chef at London's Providores). True to its name, the Oyster Inn is the spot to find local Te Matuku oysters.

            Oyster Inn in New Zealand, Designed by Katie Lochkart, Remodelista

            Above: Room One (of three) has a super king bed and a daybed from Another Country that can be converted to a child's bed.

            Oyster Inn in New Zealand, Designed by Katie Lochkart, Remodelista

            Above: In the guest bath, white square tiles set into dark grout contrast with a large circular mirror and accompanying shaving mirror.

            Oyster Inn in New Zealand, Designed by Katie Lochkart, Remodelista

            Above: Next to the apron sink, guests find white enamel Falcon tumblers and products from Aesop.

            Oyster Inn in New Zealand, Designed by Katie Lochkart, Remodelista

            Above: Rattan ottomans and wicker furniture sit beneath a black barn pendant lamp and a wall-mounted Marlin.

            The Oyster Inn in New Zealand, Designed by Katie Lockhart, Remodelista

            Oyster Inn in New Zealand, Designed by Katie Lochkart, Remodelista

            Above: Graphics from Special Group add a whimsical note.

            Oyster Inn in New Zealand, Designed by Katie Lochkart, Remodelista

            Above: The Shop at the inn is stocked with clothing and accessories for the beachgoer, including shirts from New York's Saturdays Surf, white-and-yellow Havaianas sandals exclusive to the inn.

            Oyster Inn in New Zealand, Designed by Katie Lochkart, Remodelista

            Oyster Inn in New Zealand, Designed by Katie Lochkart, Remodelista

            Above: The Oyster Inn on Waiheke Island is located just 40 minutes from Auckland by ferry. 

            For more of Lockhart's work, see our post on her shop, Everyday Needs. On the hunt for more antipodean design? Find our other favorite places to visit in New Zealand and Australia in our City Guide section.

            Enter the Remodelista Considered Design Awards 2015

            This post is an update; the original ran on April 22, 2013, as part of our Clean Sweep issue.

            More Stories from Remodelista


              0 0

              I'm a professional browser, and if you ask me, Stockholm is the best shopping city in Europe. Why? Chalk it up to notable fashion brands that have their roots in Sweden (among them, Acne, Hope, and &Other Stories) and a slew of inspired interiors shops. And they're located in some of Stockholm's most interesting historic buildings. Here are five spots where old mingles with edgy.

              A Customs House-Turned-Photography Museum

              Fotografiska in Stockholm | Remodelista

              Above: Every time I'm in Stockholm, I have to see what's on at Fotografiska, one of the leading photography museums in Europe. Located in a vast brick structure that once was a customs house, it's worth visiting for the building alone, not to mention its views over Stockholm. Photograph via Standing Ovation.

              A Hotel in a Former School for Girls 

              Miss Clara Hotel in Stockholm| Remodelista

              Above: The Miss Clara Hotel was once a school for girls, and Miss Clara was the principal. The Art Nouveau building's original steel staircase is preserved, and one of the suites was once a room where students went to pray. The rooms are decorated with elegant restraint—the conversion is the work of Swedish architect Gert Wingårdh—bentwood valets at the ends of the beds included. See more in our post Glamorous Comfort in Stockholm. Photograph via Miss Clara.

              Jeans for Sale in a Bank

              Acne Flagship Store | Remodelista

              Above: The Acne flagship store is housed in a former bank—a famous one: The Kreditbanken became known worldwide after a 1973 robbery in which the hostages developed a bond with their captors, hence the term Stockholm syndrome. While checking out the clothes, you get a firsthand look at the bank's big safe and steel bars. Photograph via Behance.

              A Garage-Turned-Vintage Shop

              Dusty Deco in Stockholm | Remodelista

              Above: Dusty Deco, a wonderful place for vintage Scandi modern finds, outgrew its original location in Stockholm's Sodermalm. The owners found the space they were after in a former garage in up-and-coming Hornstull. It's open on Saturdays and Sundays only and filled with not only great finds but charming room vignettes. Photograph via HD.

              A Restaurant in a Restored Electrical Building

              Restaurant Farang in Stockholm | Remodelista

              Above: The owners of Farang arrived in Stockholm last year after opening a trio of very good restaurants in Helsinki (Farang, Gajin, and Boulevard Social). Farang focuses on food from South East Asia and encourages guests to dine family style. The space is divided into a bar and a restaurant area, all located in an old electricity building. Photograph via Arch Daily.

              Our Weekend Guide columnist, Pauline Egge, is the founder and editor of the travel site Petite Passport. Pauline divides her time between the Netherlands and Spain, and spends much of the year crisscrossing the globe. She shares her favorite addresses with us city by city; have a look at some of her other guides:

              Enter the Remodelista Considered Design Awards 2015

              More Stories from Remodelista


                0 0

                We've been following Swedish interior designer Richard Lindvall's work since he concocted a Stockholm Bistro that Doubles as a Museum. His latest trick? Usine, a modern French restaurant invented in a Stockholm building that had been occupied by the Swedish Tax Agency, and prior to that a sausage factory. Lindvall took the space back to its origins—usine means "factory" in French—playing with a vocabulary of humble materials recast as a luxe new rendition of industrial chic.

                Photography by Mikael Axelsson; styling by Em Fexeus.

                Usine in Stockholm | Remodelista

                Above: The 2,000-square-foot space, formerly a warren of tiny rooms, underwent a yearlong transformation. It's now a combination bistro, bar, and cafe. Shown here, the main restaurant with marble-topped tables, bistro chairs, and industrial pendant lighting. (Find industrial lighting sources here, including Rubn of Sweden and Trainspotters in the UK.)

                Usine, a Stockholm restaurant in a former tax agency, designed by Richard Lindvall | Remodelista

                Above: A corner that Lindvall describes as having "an orangerie feeling" features old garden furniture, an olive tree, and an outsized industrial pendant light.

                Usine, a Stockholm restaurant in a former tax office, designed by Richard Lindvall | Remodelista

                Above: Usine showcases a high/low materials palette, from galvanized steel to cognac leather and custom maple millwork.

                Ursine Bar and Plates in Stockholm | Remodelista

                Above L: Stoneware plates with a textured glaze. Above R: Lindvall reports that 48 tons of concrete were used in the remodel—"not only for the floors but also to construct the two bars, reception desk, a large sofa table, and more." 

                Usine, a Stockholm restaurant in a former tax agency, designed by Richard Lindvall | Remodelista

                Above: The bar area is lit by steel pendant lights and neon bars that draw the eye in. The footrests are made of iron piping. 

                Usine, a Stockholm restaurant in a former tax agency, designed by Richard Lindvall | Remodelista

                Above: Cage-like perforated steel sheeting is used as a cornice over the bar. See 7 Favorites: Minimalist Brass Lights for similar hat-shaped pendants.

                Usine, a Stockholm restaurant in a former tax agency, designed by Richard Lindvall | Remodelista

                Above: A niche next to the bar is put to work as intimate seating: a custom raised leather banquette and Tolix stools.

                Usine, a Stockholm restaurant in a former tax agency, designed by Richard Lindvall | Remodelista

                Above: The water station and shelf are built from Valcromat, a colored MDF, detailed with a vintage copper sink and modern copper tap.

                  Usine Restaurant Bathroom in Stockholm | Remodelista

                Above: An expansive concrete trough sink in a multi-doored black-and-white bathroom. For more details, go to Usine.

                  Enter the Remodelista Considered Design Awards 2015

                More Stories from Remodelista


                  0 0

                  Some of my fondest memories of growing up in southern Sweden include visits to my best friend's summer cottage in Skummeslövsstrand, on the coastline of southern Sweden. The red cottage has an open living area with a stand-alone fireplace, two sheepskin-covered lounge chairs, a small but high functioning galley kitchen, and a bedroom with two sets of bunk beds.

                  Now that I live in the US, I understand why the Nordic summer escape is the envy of the rest of the world. But, in truth, you don't have to head to the archipelago to capture the experience: plenty of the best areas are simple and easy to translate.

                  Dare to Go Dark

                  Black-stained Swedish summer house | Remodelista

                  Above: Until recently red was the de facto cottage house color, but lately we've been noticing a trend of summer houses painted or stained in shades of black. Why? Because greenery looks especially great against a dark curtain. So does outdoor furniture. Black is becoming.

                  See more of the design shown here in A Modular Danish Summer House and go to Gardenista for Dark Shadows: The Pros and Cons of Painting a House Black and Trend Alert: Black Fences.

                  Let Life Revolve Around the Hearth

                  Swedish-home-free-standing-stove-by-Swedish Architects-LASC-Studio I Remodelista

                  Above: A very popular feature in Scandi summer homes is a freestanding fireplace that heats the entire living area. Not your grandmother's stove, the latest generation of wood heaters offer fuel efficiency and lower emissions, making them both powerful and environmentally responsible. For ideas, see 10 Easy Pieces: Freestanding Wood Stoves and Design Sleuth: The Camp Stove for Home and Wilderness.

                  Create a Shipshape Look with Paneling

                  summerhome-on-the-Swedish-island-of-Gotland-shiplap-Remodelista

                  Above: White-painted shiplap paneling is common in Scandi woodland cabins and coastal cottages as a clean-lined and cozy finishing touch. To learn more, see Expert Advice: The Enduring Appeal of Shiplap and tour Tiina Laakonen's Hamptons House.

                  Join the Sheepskin Brigade

                  Tham-and-Videgard-Hansson-Architect-Archipelago-Home-Remodelista 

                  Above: Scandi summer nights get chilly. Layering beds and chairs with sheepskins, that longstanding Scandi touch, adds warmth and lends the austere rooms a vitality.

                  Build Beds Wherever You Can 

                  Built-in-beds-Scandi-Summer-Home-Remodelista 

                  Above: A setup that saves a lot of space and works well for visiting crowds, bunks (with under the bed storage) are another Nordic cottage staple: See 24 Built-In Bunks for Summer Sleepovers. This Danish summer house was designed by Norwegian JVA Architects via Archdaily

                  Use Shelves in Place of Furniture

                  Tiny Bedroom in Swedish Cottage I Remodelista

                  Above: Summer cottages are typically tiny with little wiggle room in the bedrooms. Skip the bedside tables and instead use a favorite Scandi device: wall shelving as storage. 

                  Bathe with a View  

                  Danish summer house outdoor shower | Remodelista  

                  Above: Once summer finally reaches the Nordic countries, Scandinavians do as much living out in the open as possible. This Danish house features the ultimate summer detail: an outdoor shower and tub combo. For more plein-air bathing, see our roundup of 29 Outdoor Summer Showers. Photograph via Bo Bedre by Andreas Mikkel Hansen.

                  Let It All Hang Out

                  TineKHome-summerhouse-Remodelista 

                  Above: Dryers are unusual and unthinkable in Scandi summer places. Shown here, Tine Kjeldsen, founder of Tine K Home, follows tradition and hangs all her clothes to dry on lines. Photograph by Morten Holtum.

                  Find more Ideas to Steal: 

                  Enter the Remodelista Considered Design Awards 2015

                  More Stories from Remodelista


                    0 0

                    All our friends in LA's Echo Park are abuzz about their new favorite hangout, Ostrich Farm, chef Jaime Turrey's restaurant debut (he formerly manned the popular Monsieur Egg pushcart). Turrey specializes in cooking over a live fire, and his results have been earning rave reviews, but what grabbed our attention is his wife Brooke Fruchtman's homemade dining room design.

                    Photography by Bri Emery of DesignLoveFest, unless otherwise noted.

                    Brooke Fruchtman and chef Jaime Turrey, owners of Ostrich Farm in LA | Remodelista

                    Above: "We were looking for a space for many years—even, I think, before we really took the idea of opening our own restaurant seriously," says Brooke, shown here, with Jaime (the two met when she sold him a pair of boxing gloves at a yard sale in SF) and their kids. Brooke left her longstanding job as an associate vice president at LACMA to design the restaurant and run the front of the house. Located on West Sunset, Ostrich Farm is named for a railway that once ran down the boulevard. Photograph by Sally Peterson.

                    Ostrich Farm in LA | Remodelista

                    Above: The restaurant occupies a long-vacant space formerly occupied by a pupuseria: "It was painted many, many shades of purple with an abandoned lot in back, windows that had been covered up, and a disco ball dangling from the ceiling. I actually regret not keeping that disco ball," says Brooke.

                    Envisioning a bright neighborhood restaurant, "something cool and casual," she turned to friends who own fabrication studio/vintage house Style de Vie for the custom work, including the tufted banquettes and wood-topped tables. "It was so comforting to have a team we trusted because this process was totally new to us and we were working on an extremely tight budget." Photograph by Elizabeth Daniels.

                    Ostrich Farm in LA | Remodelista

                    Above: The bar stools and marble bar are also the work of Style de Vie. The Thonet Era Armchairs are from DWR: "I’m obsessed with rounded back chairs," says Brooke. "Even though these are so wide we probably sacrificed a seat or two in an already small space, it was worth it. In fact, I love them so much, I bought them in white for our house. I think they're a great deal."

                    As for the wall hangings, they're Indian block-printed cotton scarves by Remodelista favorite Block Shop (see Lily and Hopie Stockman's Wearable Paintings). Brooke says she extemporaneously tacked them up the day Ostrich Farm debuted "and now cannot imagine our space without them." Photograph by Elizabeth Daniels.

                    Ostrich Farm in LA via DesignLoveFest | Remodelista

                    Above L: The restaurant's lights are the work of Doug Newton of Nightwood in New York: "I was searching for an embarrassingly long time for the perfect brass sconces that have a handmade quality," says Brooke. Above R: The restaurant's Fiddle Leaf has a snake-charmer-style DIY coiled rope container: "It's just a lot of rope hot glued together." (Learn all about the Fiddle Leaf Fig at Gardenista.)

                    Ostrich Farm in LA via DesignLoveFest | Remodelista

                    Above: The tables have a soft wax finish and are set with simple glassware (which the couple sourced on Remodelista). For similar tumblers, see 10 Easy Pieces: Basic Drinking Glasses.

                    Ostrich Farm in LA via DesignLoveFest | Remodelista

                    Above L: "Our stemless wine glasses evoke the casual vibe we're going for," says Brooke. Above R: The heavy linen napkins—all 300 of them—were stitched by the family's nanny.

                    Ostrich Farm restaurant in LA via DesignLoveFest | Remodelista

                    Above: Ostrich Farm is at 1525 W. Sunset Blvd in Echo Park, LA. See more at @ostrichfarmla on Instagram.

                    Check out more local favorites in our LA City Guide, including the Covell Hotel and LA's Best Source for 20th-Century Antiques.

                    And take a look at An LA Cliffhanger, a house owned by Cleo and McShane Murnane of Project M+ design, who are Ostrich Farm regulars.

                    Enter the Remodelista Considered Design Awards 2015

                    More Stories from Remodelista


                      0 0

                      Nicole Hollis drew upon Seattle’s rich history of lumber, gold, and sea trading for inspiration in her design for the interiors of the new Palladian Hotel. Housed in a 1910 landmark in happening Belltown, the building provided Hollis and team with an ideal backdrop for her layerings of natural materials such as marble and wood accented with velvet upholstery and metallic touches. The results? A decidedly gritty-glam look befitting the city. 

                      Photography by Laure Joliet

                      Palladian Hotel in Seattle with Interiors by Nicole Hollis | Remodelista

                      Above: The landmark building offers iconic views across the Puget Sound.

                      Palladian Hotel in Seattle with Interiors by Nicole Hollis | Remodelista

                      Above: Hollis cloaked the lobby in the deep blues and greens of Puget Sound. The restored terrazzo floors are original to the building.

                      Palladian Hotel in Seattle with Interiors by Nicole Hollis | Remodelista

                      Above: In the moody library, the fireplace is stacked with antique books.

                      Palladian Hotel in Seattle with Interiors by Nicole Hollis | Remodelista

                      Above: Reclaimed marble from Seattle's old King Street Station lines the stairway walls. 

                      Palladian Hotel in Seattle with Interiors by Nicole Hollis | Remodelista

                      Above: Glimmers of gold can be spotted throughout the hotel. 

                      Palladian Hotel in Seattle with Interiors by Nicole Hollis | Remodelista

                      Above: Hollis furnished the rooms like lofts, mixing antique area rugs with leather-bound books and old-fashioned telephones. The leather sling chair is by Sit and Read.

                      Palladian Hotel in Seattle with Interiors by Nicole Hollis | Remodelista

                      Above: The custom lighting throughout the hotel is the work of Ladies & Gentlemen Studio (a Seattle duo who recently decamped to Brooklyn). On the wall is a crocheted Mega Doily Rug made of oversized cotton rope, also by Ladies & Gentlemen Studio.

                      Palladian Hotel in Seattle with Interiors by Nicole Hollis | Remodelista

                      Above: Brass accents are a staple throughout the hotel, including this kitchen suite. 

                      Palladian Hotel in Seattle with Interiors by Nicole Hollis | Remodelista

                      Above: The custom platform beds have reclaimed wood headboards with brass rivets and inset shelving. Celebrity portrait throw pillows (of David Bowie and Bill Murray, among others) introduce interesting bedmates.

                      Palladian Hotel in Seattle with Interiors by Nicole Hollis | Remodelista

                      Above: Vintage city maps and pieces by local artists decorate the walls.

                      Palladian Hotel in Seattle with Interiors by Nicole Hollis | Remodelista

                      Above: The bathrooms feature custom vanity stands with brass fixtures and vintage-inspired mirrors. 

                      Palladian Hotel in Seattle with Interiors by Nicole Hollis | Remodelista

                      Above: Bathroom floors are lined with classic hexagonal marble tiles, and the larger suites have clawfoot tubs.

                      For more details, go to the Palladian Hotel.

                      Nicole Hollis is based in San Francisco and a member of the Remodelista Designer/Architect Directory. To see more work by Nicole Hollis in our posts Old World Meets New World in the Napa Valley and A Serene Sonoma Guest Retreat.

                      See more lighting by Ladies & Gentlemen Studio.

                      If you're coveting a leather chair, check out these options: 5 Favorites: Modern Leather Sling Chairs.

                      Enter the Remodelista Considered Design Awards 2015

                      More Stories from Remodelista


                        0 0

                        Designers Kristin Hein and Philip Cozzi of Hein+Cozzi "dumped our sandbox upside down," as they say, and "moved life and studio from the Hamptons to Provincetown, Massachusetts" not too long ago. Growing up, Philip worked summers at Ciro and Sals, a legendary P-Town restaurant co-owned by Ciro Cozzi, an artist and restaurateur. "Everyone, I mean everyone, came—from John Wayne to John Waters, from Robert Motherwell to Norman Mailer," he says. "Provincetown is America's oldest active art colony and we love the sense of community. People pop by and wave, there are impromptu cocktail parties, we ride our bikes out to dinner, to the bank, to the grocery store." 

                        When the Old Homestead, a guest house and local landmark in the East End of town, hit the market, the couple took the plunge. Built in 1850 for Captain Frank Rich, a sea captain and sexton of the Church of Saint Mary of the Harbor, "the property was dilapidated and yet wonderfully untouched," Kristin says. "Through every window there was an idyllic view. We kept the history of the place intact, preserving the original beams, the pine floors, and the brick chimney." The Old Homestead is now a luxe two-bedroom, two-bath rental available by the week, stocked fridge, bikes, and paddleboards included. 

                        Photography by Paul Freehof.

                        Old Homestead in Provincetown, MA | Remodelista

                        Above: The veranda overlooks Provincetown Harbor and Cape Cod Bay in the distance. The Paul 13 Lantern is from Remains Lighting, the early American farm table is from Nellie's of Amagansett, and the caned Thonet chairs are from 1stdibs.

                        Old Homestead Inn in Provincetown, MA | Remodelista

                        Above: In the living area, vintage club chairs mingle with an African bench from Juan Montoya in NYC, carved Chinese stools, and a Fortuny fixture from Ralph Pucci (Philip is the former design director of the studio), and the vintage Khotan and Tibetan rugs are from Galerie Shabab in NYC.

                        Old Homestead in Provincetown, MA | Remodelista

                        Above: The shiplap walls are painted a gray-violet shade from the Guggenheim Collection by Fine Paints of Europe (G020 to be precise). "It feels like the moment before nautical twilight as you gaze out onto the bay," Kristin says.

                        Old Homestead in Provincetown, MA | Remodelista

                        Above: Kristin and Philip retained the original brick chimney, pine floors, and wood beams. "We did add the shiplap to unify the space," they say.

                        Old Homestead in Provincetown, MA | Remodelista

                        Above: The oak Cutter Wardrobe by Skagerak is $699 from Horne. Have a look at 11 Display-Worthy Clothes Hangers.

                        Old Homestead in Provincetown, MA | Remodelista

                        Above: The kitchen includes a Bertazzoni range, a narrow Active Smart Fisher Paykel Refrigerator with Bottom Freezer (see our post on the company's dishwasher drawers here), and Tolix Marais stools. (Designing your own compact kitchen? See Skinny Refrigerators and Best Appliances for Small Kitchens for ideas.)

                        Old Homestead in Provincetown, MA | Remodelista

                        Above: Glassware from Reidel is stored overhead.

                        Old Homestead in Provincetown, MA | Remodelista

                        Above: Throughout the house Apartment Pendants with Clear Glass Shades from Schoolhouse Electric are casually wrapped around the existing beams.

                        Old Homestead in Provincetown, MA | Remodelista

                        Above: The carved Chinese fertility bed is from Julie Hodgess in London (Kristin worked for her design company for a few years before forming Hein+Cozzi with Philip).

                        Old Homestead in Provincetown, MA | Remodelista

                        Above: The bathrooms have Duravit Vero Washbasins and Waterworks Highgate taps and fixtures. The hex tiles are from Oak Park Tile.

                        Old Homestead in Provincetown, MA | Remodelista

                        Above: Guest rooms are outfitted with organic Saatva mattresses and Society bed linens sourced from ABC Carpet & Home.

                        Old Homestead in Provincetown | Remodelista

                        Above: Sliding doors open onto the main living space.

                        Old Homestead in Provincetown, MA | Remodelista

                        Above: A shiplap-paneled bath with a Mini Cutter Wardrobe by Skagerak for towels and Fresnel adjustable wall/ceiling lights designed by Joe Colombo for Oluce.

                        Old Homestead in Provincetown, MA | Remodelista

                        Above: "We are 60 miles out into the ocean, the tides rise and fall 11 feet twice a day, the light rivals Greece, the sense of adventure and freedom is palpable," Kristin says. The house rents by the week; for booking information, go to the Old Homestead Provincetown

                        We also recommend the Salt House Inn in Provincetown. And for another old Cape Cod house that we love, see Justine's Soulful Family Cottage (and learn how to make her Cape Cod Beach Plum Jam).

                        Enter the Remodelista Considered Design Awards 2015

                        More Stories from Remodelista


                          0 0

                          Admired in the heart of Helsinki's newly revived Old Market Hall: Story, a trim cafe-restaurant with waterfront views and a surprise overhead installation of fish trap lights. The design is the work of Joanna Laajisto, a master at combining Scandi rigor with a playful touch.

                          Photography via Joanna Laajisto Creative Studio.

                          Story restaurant in Helsinki's Old Market Hall | Remodelista

                          Above: The 1889 market, Vanha Kauppahalli, a landmark protected by the National Board of Antiquities, reopened last summer. It's filled with food stalls, and Story is situated in the heart of the hall in the spot once used for loading horse carriages.

                          "The challenge was to get the high-ceilinged space to feel intimate instead of a space to pass through," says Laajisto, who responded by creating three discreet seating areas. The chalkboards that front the kitchen/bar, shown here, are painted in a custom-mixed navy.

                          Story restaurant in Helsinki's Old Market Hall | Remodelista

                          Above: Herbs in white ceramic pots bring the orderly oak shelving to life. Cooking is done on the premises using ingredients gathered from the market and seafood is a specialty

                          Story restaurant in Helsinki's Old Market Hall | Remodelista

                          Above: An elevated section overlooking the harbor offers leather-upholstered oak booths lit by a customized versions of Laajisto's Edit Wall Lamp.

                          Story restaurant in Helsinki's Old Market Hall | Remodelista

                          Above: Muted two-toned walls are paired with Danish design studio Hay's colorful Copenhague Chairs. Note the bouquets of flatware on the tables. 

                          Story restaurant in Helsinki's Old Market Hall | Remodelista

                          Above: Story is owned by four of the city's best-known restaurateurs, Anders Westerholm, Matti Sarkkinen, Teemu Aura and Markus Hurskainen, and the fishing traps came out of one of their summer houses. Laajisto used them to solve a problem posed by the hall's building restrictions: Lights aren't allowed to be suspended from the nearly 33-foot-high ceilings, so she created wall-hung sculptures.

                          The tables are the custom work of local designer Tebian and the seats are Copenhague Stools from Hay.

                          Story restaurant in Helsinki's Old Market Hall | Remodelista

                          Above: A closer look at the nautical construction.

                          Story restaurant in Helsinki's Old Market Hall | Remodelista

                          Above: The bar is faced with composite stone tile in a herringbone pattern.

                          Below: The market has a prime location overlooking the harbor. For more details, go to Story.

                          For design new, tips, and tricks, sign up to receive the daily Remodelista newsletter

                          More Stories from Remodelista


                            0 0

                            A few years ago, San Francisco–based design aficionado Charlotte Tracy needed an architect for the renovation of her summer house (see Before & After: A Summer Cottage on the Connecticut Coast). She went to her friend and local architect John Allee of Allee Architecture and Design, whom she met at boarding school in upstate New York 30 years ago. He’s inclined toward modernism, and she channels an organic Californian vibe. Drawn to the overlaps between the two, they opened Meta44, selling furniture designed by Allee, artwork by friends, and home design goods from small brands on both coasts. “We love finding well-crafted objects where modern design and natural style intersect,” Tracy says.

                            meta44 in Millerton, NY, John Allee, Charlotte Tracy | Remodelista

                            Above: Warm modern design components typical of the Meta44 aesthetic are set against the lush green backdrop of the Hudson Valley.

                            meta44 in Millerton, NY, John Allee, Charlotte Tracy | Remodelista

                            Above: Meta44 is on North Elm Avenue, an extension of the main street of Millerton, NY (Budget Travel named it "one of the 10 coolest small towns in America").

                            meta44 in Millerton, NY, John Allee, Charlotte Tracy | Remodelista

                            Above: A sample of Meta44's small brand wares include a Ferro Brass Dot Wire Bowl, Crudo Jugs, Spalted Napkin Rings, and Fog Linen Trays and Napkins. The drawing on the wall is by San Francisco artist Alex Zecca.

                            meta44 in Millerton, NY, John Allee, Charlotte Tracy, Peace Wool Industry Felt Wool Choob | Remodelista

                            Above: Designed in San Francisco, Peace Industry Choobs are chemical free and made of 100 percent carpet-grade lamb's wool and natural dyes.

                            meta44 in Millerton, NY, John Allee, Charlotte Tracy, Finn Dining Table on wood floor | Remodelista

                            Above: The 44a Finn Dining Table, designed by John Allee, combines the warmth of white oak with steel. Custom sizing and materials are available upon request.

                            meta44 in Millerton, NY, John Allee, Charlotte Tracy, 44A Stone Credenza | Remodelista

                            Above: The 44a Stone Credenza, designed by John Allee, can be wrapped in a variety of stone options. Brazilian onyx is shown here. Door and drawer fronts can be waxed, mill-finish steel, or a wood species that works with the stone "shell."

                            meta44 in Millerton, NY, John Allee, Charlotte Tracy, Peace Industry Felt Wool Runner on Wood Floor | Remodelista

                            Above: Peace Industry Area Rugs are designed in San Francisco and made from 100 percent carpet grade lamb's wool and natural dyes. They are chemical free, reversible, have no backing, and do not require a rug pad.

                            meta44 in Millerton, NY, John Allee, Charlotte Tracy | Remodelista

                            Above: The Meta44 shop is next door to John Allee's architecture practice, Allee Architecture and Design.

                            meta44 in Millerton, NY, John Allee, Charlotte Tracy | Remodelista

                            Above: Meta44's cofounders, John Allee and Charlotte Tracy, have been friends for 30 years.

                            In Reader Roundtable: Would You Hire a Friend (or Work for One)?, Tracy, Allee, and another friend, interior designer Hannah Childs, talk about what it's like when friends work together.

                            Below: Meta44 is located in central Millerton, NY.

                            More Stories from Remodelista


                              0 0

                              It was during a weekend in London with his fiancé that Olivier Gampel decided someone ought to bring fish-and-chips to Paris. An interior designer with a background in fashion retail, Gampel, though an unlikely candidate, took on the mission himself. Not surprisingly, it's the playfully suave design of Fich, his new 20-seat seafood cafe in the 3ème, that caught our attention.

                              Photography via Olivier Gampel, unless otherwise noted.

                              Fich in Paris Exterior | Remodelista

                              Above: The restaurant is located at 83 Boulevard Beaumarchais in the Marais. Fich is Gampel's shorthand for fish-and-chips. Photograph via Play Like a Girl.

                              Fich, a fish-and-chips cafe in Paris, owned and designed by Olivier Gampel | Remodelista

                              Above: Gampel, whose Paris design firm is known as Les Nouveaux Decorateurs, outfitted his tiny space with hardwearing natural materials: terrazzo-topped cafe tables that evoke the bottom of the sea (or a fish tank), wooden bench seating, low-backed chairs, and marine-blue concrete floor tiles.

                              The tile, he told us, comes from Portugal—it's uncannily like the Marrakech Design hexagonal cement Dandelion Blue Tile in McShane and Cleo Murname's LA master bath that we spotlighted in Steal This Look.

                              Fich Tabletop in Paris | Remodelista

                              Above: One-time-use wood utensils are paired with black napkins. The menu graphics are the work of Paris- and London-based illustrator Yesonme, who Gampel discovered online. Photograph via Miam Paris.

                              Fich Restaurant in Paris | Remodelista

                              Above: Terrazzo is also applied to several of the walls. Marble-patterned ceramic dishes organize small offerings, including My Crazy Pop popcorn. Photograph via Play Like a Girl.

                              Enamelware dishes at Fich-restaurant-Paris-Olivier-Gampel-Remodelista-5.jpg

                              Above: Gampel serves mashed peas as a fish-and-chips accompaniment, but draws the line at newspaper wrapping. Fich's tableware is blue-edged enamelware—go to our Enamelware posts for sourcing ideas, including Made in the U.S. Enamel Plates, Cups, and Bowls. Shown here, lemons for the house "citronnade détox," fresh lemonade with mint.

                              For more details, go to Fich. And see more Paris restaurants—including The Lovely Bones, a stripped-down bistro, and Clamato, another seafood hotspot—in our Paris City Guide. For an affordable and stylish place to stay in Paris, take a look at the Hotel Henriette.

                              More Stories from Remodelista


                                0 0

                                The ultimate job for a Francophile? Laurie Furber, Bay Area–based founder of online housewares emporium Elsie Green, travels to Lyon, France, three times a year to scout for vintage wares. Lyon, the country's third-largest city, is "a bit more low key than Paris and has a great design scene," she says. "The color palette of the city is beautiful, and it's filled with dramatic sculptures, churches, hand-painted frescoes, a Roman amphitheater, and a mix of medieval, Renaissance, and modern architecture. There's a great blend of old and new (the city is 2,000 years old), a vibrant food scene (it's where Paul Bocuse and Daniel Boulud got their starts), and a rich silk production history dating from the 1800s." Here's a roundup of Laurie's favorite haunts.

                                Favorite Hotels

                                Hotel College in Lyon | Remodelista

                                Above: "The most design-y option is the Hotel Collège; the owners spent three years searching for vintage school desks and benches to create a classroom and dorm atmosphere. I often stay at the bare-bones Hotel Saint Vincent on the river. It's not fancy in the least, but the owner serves the best breakfast and is warm and welcoming. It's like staying with your favorite old uncle." 

                                Favorite Restaurants

                                Bistro Potager in Lyon | Remodelista

                                Above: "Le Bistrot du Potager has a great bar and wine list; perfect for a casual lunch or dinner."

                                L'Institution Restaurant in Lyon, France | Remodelista

                                Above: "L'Institution is an iconic Lyon establishment, built in 1864 and overhauled in 2013 by Jacques Garcia. Another old-school classic is Brasserie Georges, which has the largest dining room in Europe and was established in 1839. They have two seatings, you have to be on time, sit down like a civilized person, and eat what they bring."

                                Gourmand St. Jean in Lyon, France | Remodelista

                                Above: "Le Gourmand de Saint Jean: Lyonnaise specialities served at a sidewalk cafe."

                                Favorite Shops

                                Hyggelig in Lyon | Remodelista

                                Above: "Hyggelig is a high-end concept store with a Scandinavian twist. Simple silhouettes, playful patterns and colors."

                                Pop and Shoes in Lyon, France | Remodelista

                                Above: "Pop and Shoes is the best clothing/shoe shop in Lyon, and the best place to spot home design trends. It's also a great place for a quick café crème." 

                                Bensimon Concept Store in Lyon | Remodelista

                                Above: "Bensimon, the French fashion brand, has a nice home collection. Sort of a cool West Elm."

                                August Cocotte in Lyon | Remodelista

                                Above: "August et Cocotte has a nice blend of vintage and new housewares."

                                Terreaux Bricolage in Lyon, France | Remodelista

                                Above: "Terreaux Bricolage, a Lyonnaise hardware store, has cloth lamp cord in a range of colors and cool furniture."

                                Galeries du Desordre in Lyon, France | Remodelista

                                Above: "Galerie du Desordre is a very well curated and quirky little gallery of finds from around Europe. The color palette will make you swoon."

                                Les Puces du Canal in Lyon, France | Remodelista

                                Above: "Le Village des Containers Les Puces du Canal is on the outskirts of town; each tiny antiques shop occupies its own shipping container."

                                For a guide to Paris's most happening restaurants, go to Expert Advice: 11 Under-the-Radar Parisian Dining Spots.

                                Cast your daily vote for the Remodelista Considered Design Awards 2015!

                                More Stories from Remodelista


                                  0 0

                                  Douglas McMaster, a veteran of forward-thinking international kitchens such as Greenhouse by Joost in Melbourne, Australia, and St. John in London, is on a crusade to create the world's most sustainable restaurant. "I want to completely cut out the middleman and go directly to the suppliers, only buying or producing what is naturally in season," he says in an interview with Vice. "I call it a pre-industrial food system. It's a way of producing, sourcing, and respecting food like we did 100 years ago. The production of waste has been eliminated by simply choosing to trade directly with farmers, using reusable delivery vessels, and choosing local ingredients that themselves generate no waste."

                                  The extreme environmentalism carries over in the interior. McMaster enlisted local firm Baines & Fricker, a husband/wife team, to design the restaurant's dining room. 

                                  Silo Restaurant in Brighton, UK | Remodelista

                                  Above: The restaurant's exterior has a giant sliding barn door. "Their waste-avoiding initiatives are exhaustive and startling," says The Guardian. "They cultivate their own mushrooms in discarded coffee grounds. If you want a receipt, it's emailed."

                                  Silo Cafe in Brighton, UK | Remodelista

                                  Above: A view of the dining area.

                                  Bertha Composter at Silo Composter | Remodelista

                                  Above: The cafe's composting machine, which is front and center in the dining room, turns 60 kilos of organic waste into compost in 24 hours, eliminating the need for bins. Local businesses are encouraged to bring in their waste to be composted and extra compost is available free to members of the community.

                                  Silo Restaurant in Brighton, UK | Remodelista

                                  Above: The tabletops are made out of reclaimed industrial floor tiles.

                                  Silo Restaurant in Brighton, UK | Remodelista

                                  Above L: A magnetic utility wall serves as a pot rack. Above R: Plates are made from recycled plastic bags.

                                  Silo Restaurant in Brighton, UK | Remodelista

                                  Above: An array of baked goods on offer.

                                  Silo Cafe in Brighton | Remodelista

                                  Above: Repurposed drain pipes (planted with wheatgrass) are mounted haphazardly on the white painted brick walls. 

                                  Silo Cafe in Brighton, England | Remodelista

                                  Above: Laser-cut coasters by Jim Wilson of Brighton Arts College are made from building material offcuts. 

                                  Silo Cafe Table in Brighton | Remodelista

                                  Above: Designers Baines & Fricker used legs from unwanted school tables for the dining tables. The seating is made from pulped wood waste. Photograph by David Charbit.

                                  Silo Restaurant in Brighton, UK | Remodelista

                                  Above L: McMaster has named his wooden flour mill from Austria "Gertrude." Above R: A freshly baked loaf.

                                  Silo Restaurant Mission Statement | Remodelista

                                  Above: The mission statement.

                                  For more information, go to Silo Cafe

                                  Check out another European cafe with a noble mission: Restaurant as Social Experiment: 28 Posti in Milan.

                                    Cast your daily vote for the Remodelista Considered Design Awards 2015!

                                  More Stories from Remodelista


                                    0 0

                                    Husband/wife owners Rupert and Carrie Blease (he's a Brit, she's a Californian) met in the kitchen of Michelin two-star restaurant Le Manoir aux Quat'Saisons in Oxfordshire, England, more than a decade ago. They spent a few years in NYC (he in the kitchen at Per Se and she at Blue Hill) and then moved to San Francisco, where they worked in local establishments before striking out on their own.

                                    Their newly opened restaurant, named after the couple's favorite UK pub (and Rupert's father Stanley), has "British and European influences," the chefs say, and interiors by Boor Bridges Architecture (a member of the Remodelista Architect/Designer Directory). Artisan-made flourishes include a felted wool wall hanging by Ashley Helvey, black ceramic lights by SF potter Mel Rice Ceramica, and birch tables made in Los Angeles by Brandon Munoz. 

                                    Lord Stanley Restaurant in San Francisco | Remodelista

                                    Above: The light-flooded dining room has a poured and polished concrete floor. The Nordmyra Birch Dining Chairs are from Ikea.

                                    Lord Stanley Restaurant in San Francisco | Remodelista

                                    Above: A view of the lofty dining room from the mezzanine level.

                                    Lord Stanley Restaurant in San Francisco | Remodelista

                                    Above: An accent wall is painted pale gray; the tables were custom made by Monkwood Studio of LA.

                                    Lord Stanley Restaurant in San Francisco | Remodelista

                                    Above: Small plates and cocktails are served at the standup bar, including lemon verbena olives in cut-glass bowls (see No. 2 in Remodelista's Top 15 Interiors Trends of 2015).

                                    Lord Stanley Restaurant in San Francisco | Remodelista

                                    Above: Industrial materials such as raw steel contrast with clean Scandinavian-looking elements.

                                    Lord Stanley Restaurant in San Francisco | Remodelista

                                    Above: A plasterwork detail.

                                    Lord Stanley in San Francisco | Remodelista

                                    Above: Black ceramic lamps by SF's Mel Rice Ceramica

                                    Lord Stanley Restaurant in San Francisco | Remodelista

                                    Above: A custom concierge desk by Boor Bridges.

                                    Lord Stanley Restaurant in San Francisco | Remodelista

                                    Above: The communal table on the mezzanine level. 

                                    Lord Stanley Restaurant in San Francisco | Remodelista

                                    Above: The Felted Wool Wall Hanging by Ashley Helvey is made from wool sourced from Decatur Island wild sheep shorn by Nich Hance McElry. 

                                    Lord Stanley is in SF's Russian Hill.

                                     See more of our favorite Boor Bridges restaurant projects at Architect Visit: Sightglass by Boor Bridges Architecture and The Mill: A "Bright and Messy" SF Cafe

                                    Cast your daily vote for the Remodelista Considered Design Awards 2015!

                                    More Stories from Remodelista


                                      0 0

                                      Melbourne, Australia's former Pentridge Prison is now Pentridge Village, a housing and shopping complex with a cafe that's a celebration of economy—and design freedom.

                                      Photography by Martina Gemmola via Biasol Design Studio.

                                      Jury, a restaurant in a converted prison in Melbourne, by BIasol Design Studio | Remodelista

                                      Above: The restaurant is the work of Biasol Design Studio of Melbourne, who told us: "We wanted to bring life to the site and allow it to move on from its dark past." Working with a tight budget, they channeled that life by using plywood paneling and structural timbers inset here and there with playful triangles of color.

                                      Jury, a restaurant in a converted prison in Melbourne, by BIasol Design Studio | Remodelista

                                      Above: The triangular fretwork continues on the ceiling, which is hung with Nud Collection pendant lights with Plumen bulbs: see World's Most Stylish Light Bulb.

                                      Jury, a restaurant in a converted prison in Melbourne, by BIasol Design Studio | Remodelista

                                      Above: The custom tables and stools are also made of plywood. Greenery added throughout softens the angularity.

                                      Detail of a wall-hung light at Jury, a restaurant in a converted prison in Melbourne, by BIasol Design Studio | Remodelista

                                      Above: DIY idea: a wall pendant created with wooden pegs and extra-long cloth cording ending in a simple socket. (For more pendants sources, see our Design Sleuth posts on the Color Cord Company and Wrk-Shp.)

                                      Three of the walls are concrete—the designers used an Australian product called Rockcote

                                      Jury Restaurant in Melbourne, Australia | Remodelista

                                      Above: The pastel palette is peppered with touches of black.

                                      Jury, a restaurant in a converted prison in Melbourne, by BIasol Design Studio | Remodelista

                                      Above: The restaurant sign is made of CNC-milled plywood backlit with LED lights. 

                                      Jury is in the Melbourne suburb of Coburg.

                                      Go to Social Experiment: 28 Posti in Milan to see an architect-designed restaurant fitted out by inmates. And, on Gardenista, go to Orange is the New Green to see a prison garden on Rikers Island.

                                      http://www.remodelista.com/the-2015-remodelista-considered-design-awards

                                       

                                      More Stories from Remodelista


                                        0 0

                                        Sinatra slept here. The sprawling Victorian Chequit inn on Shelter Island, New York's low-key Hamptons alternative, began life as a Methodist retreat and then morphed into a stylish city escape. Under the new ownership of Provincetown hoteliers David Bowd and Kevin O'Shea of Salt Hotels, it's back—big time.

                                        Photography via the Chequit.

                                        The reinvented Chequit Inn on Shelter Island, NY | Remodelista

                                        Above: Built in 1872, the Chequit (which, by the way, is pronounced chee-quit) was initially a dining hall surrounded by a tent camp; it has operated as a hotel since the 1940s. Dowd and O'Shea spent the past year giving it a refresh. Both are veterans of the industry—Bowd is former COO of Andre Balazs Properties (which includes the Sunset on Shelter Island), and O'Shea, a RISD-trained designer, worked on the creative teams at Starwood and Morgans Hotel Group—who have recently started building their own empire: See The Hamptons Come to Cape Cod: Salt House Inn in Provincetown. O'Shea's firm Kevin O'Shea Designs oversaw the refurbishment.

                                        The Chequit Inn on Shelter Island | Remodelista

                                        Above: The porch is, as it's always been, the main gathering place. O'Shea and team preserved as much as possible of the structure's original detailing while giving it "a crisp and contemporary interpretation."

                                        The Chequit Inn on Shelter Island | Remodelista

                                        Above: "At bed-and-breakfasts you have this incredible personal service experience, but terrible design—it’s like sleeping in great grandma's house,” O’Shea told the New York Observer. “We wanted to keep the guest experience side of it, but create a highly designed place, where we’re pushing boundaries and making something different.”

                                        In the lobby, the challenge, he tells us, was that it "had to transcend the seasons: So I kept it light enough for the summer but cozy enough for the winter." 

                                        Suite at the revived Chequit Inn on Shelter Island, NY | Remodelista

                                        Above: The overhauled guest rooms are finished in a pink and gray palette with dollops of yellow: "The colors were inspired by the incredible light on the island; the rose walls glow throughout the day and soften into the evening," says O'Shea. Shown here, the sitting room in a suite with daybed in an alcove.

                                        There are 37 rooms total: 19 in the main house, as well as an additional 17 in separate historic structures known as The Cottage and The Summer House, which can be rented individually or to groups.

                                        Bed with scalloped headboard at the revived Chequit Inn, Shelter Island, NY | Remodelista

                                        Above: Our favorite detail: the custom headboards. "I was inspired by an image of an old motel room I've had in my files for years; it's where the shape came from," says O'Shea, "and the brass finials are a play on Victorian brass beds." The bedrooms are painted in a two-toned blush/French gray mix: Benjamin Moore Sugarcane and Graystone.

                                        Two-toned room at the revived Victorian Chequit Inn on Shelter Island, NY | Remodelista

                                        Above: The original wood floors were restored and layered with "tribal-inspired" patterned rugs. The yellow Windsor-style chairs are Serena & Lily's Tucker Chair, which comes in eight colors, $188 each. (See more in 10 Easy Pieces: The Windsor Chair Revisited.) 

                                        Pink and gray details at the revived Chequit Inn on Shelter Island, NY | Remodelista

                                        Above L: Brass reading lights and space-saving built-in bedside shelves. O'Shea notes, "You'll never have to go looking for a plug to charge your phone; there are custom plugs on each bedside table from Conway Electric." (Read our Remodeling 101 Primers to learn where to place electrical outlets in every room.) Above R: The all-new bathrooms are tiled in black and white.

                                        Black and white bathroom at the Chequit Inn | Remodelista

                                        Above: An easy-to-replicate detail: black brackets paired with white open shelves piled with white (and a touch of black) accessories.

                                        Beadboard wainscotting at the Chequit Inn on Shelter Island, NY | Remodelista

                                        Above: Classic New England tones and tongue-and-groove wainscoting in the hallway.

                                        Red Maple, the restaurant at the reinvented Chequit Inn on Shelter Island, NY | Remodelista

                                        Above: The Chequit has a new in-house cafe, as well as a bar/restaurant, Red Maple, shown here.

                                          Outdoor tables at the Chequit Inn on Shelter Island, NY | Remodelista

                                        Above: The seating extends under the trees. Rooms at the Chequit start at $195 a night. 

                                        Looking for a place to stay? Find our best recommendations in our Hotels & Lodging archive, including Salt Hotel's Salt House Inn in Provincetown. And for restaurant and shopping tips, explore our City Guides.

                                        More Stories from Remodelista


                                          0 0

                                          Designer Tyler Hays established his signature luxe-rustic look at BDDW, his handmade furniture company in New York. More recently, he's delved into the world of trading blankets, stoneware mugs, and rural economic development as the rescue owner of M. Crow & Co., a general store in Lostine, Oregon, not far from where he himself grew up in the Wallowa valley trapping mink and building go karts.

                                          "The Crow family tenaciously ran the store for 107 years," he says. "In 2012, I purchased the store to prevent its closure and the loss of an iconic memory of my childhood." Since then, he has been stocking it—and the M. Crow & Co. online shop—with his own work. "I am basically making from scratch the things I want or need and making extras and trying to sell them." His wants and needs? A self-described "awkward collision" of goods, from toy bows to ceramic pickle jars, all peerlessly crafted, stitched leather detailing often included—and beyond pricey. If you ask us, the American answer to Henry Beguelin has been born.

                                          M.Crow & Co. hanging bud vase by Tyler Hays | Remodelista

                                          Above: Hanging Bud Vase of blown glass and leather, oak "hanging puck" included; $275.

                                          M.Crow & Co. striped boiled merino blanket by Tyler Hays | Remodelista

                                          Above: Striped Boiled Merino Wool Blanket, 65 by 50 inches, knit in Hays's other outpost, his Philadelphia studio; $700.

                                          Plywood-covered speakers from M.Crow & Co. by Tyler Hays | Remodelista

                                          Above: Pair of Douglas fir plywood-encased Audiophile Speakers by Phila Audio Corp; $450.

                                          Stoneware coffee mug from M.Crow & Co. by Tyler Hays | Remodelista

                                          Above: Stoneware Coffee Mug, $48, made from Wallowa County, Oregon, clay, and glazed with ashes from M.Crow's wood-burning stove.

                                          "I have designed many of the products around locally gathered materials because my ultimate goal is to make the products there (currently, I make them in my Philadelphia studio)," says Hays.

                                           

                                          Steak knives from M.Crow & Co. by Tyler Hays | Remodelista 

                                          Above: Bandsaw Blade Steak Knives of carbon steel with handles available in four woods (from left; black walnut, osage orange, toasted maple, and American holly); $65 each.

                                          M.Crow & Co. thin cutting board by Tyler Hays | Remodelista

                                          Above: Thin Cutting Board with leather covered handle, available in cherry, oak, and oxidized oak, from $210.

                                          Bear Figher's Hair Fixative from M.Crow & Co. by Tyler Hays | Remodelista

                                          Above: Hays concocts his Bear Fighter's Hair Fixative "using only locally gathered materials: pine tar, beeswax from our hives, and oils we expell ourselves from local grains and other wild natural ingredients." The container is made of Wallowa County clay; $120.

                                          Waxed canvas tote from M. Crow & Co. by Tyler Hays | Remodelista

                                          Above: Waxed Canvas Tote with leather pocket, cord handles, and an interior tie closure in plaid; $450.

                                          Copper hook from M.Crow & Co. by Tyler Hays | Remodelista

                                          Above: Copper Hanger, 2 by 2.15 inches, bronze screws included, $45.

                                          Linen beach blanket with leather weights from M. Crow & Co. by Tyler Hays | Remodelista 

                                          Above: Linen Beach Blanket with Leather Weights; $420.

                                          M. Crow & Co. is at 133 Highway 82, Main Street in Lostine, in northeastern Oregon; it's open seven days a week.

                                          We're longtime fans of Tyler Hays and BDDW; see some of our favorite designs here and check out his answer to the World's Most Beautiful Ping-Pong Table.

                                          More Stories from Remodelista


                                            0 0

                                            Husband/wife team Sarah and Nick Suarez, veterans of beloved NYC/Brooklyn dining institutions such as Marlow & Sons, Romans, Gramercy Tavern, and the Modern, moved to Columbia County not long ago to open Gaskins, their first culinary joint effort in Germantown, New York. The interiors by Brooklyn-based Studio Tack are spare and simple, in keeping with the building's humble heritage (it was once a five-and-dime and later a grocery store) and the low-key but stealth luxury vibe of Columbia County. 

                                            Gaskins Restaurant in Hudson Valley, Photo by Samantha Goh via And North | Remodelista

                                            Above: The custom tables are by Jason Roskey of Fern Studio. Photograph by Samantha Goh via And North.

                                            Gaskins Restaurant in Hudson Valley, Photo by Samantha Goh via And North | Remodelista

                                            Above: Sarah takes care of the flower arrangements, sourcing her blooms from local growers like Cedar Farm, Whistledown, and Tiny Hearts. A vintage mirror reflects the afternoon sunlight. Photograph by Samantha Goh via And North.

                                            Gaskins Restaurant in Germantown | Remodelista

                                            Above: A row of bentwood barstools lines the bar. Photograph by Samantha Goh via And North.

                                            Gaskins Restaurant in Germantown | Remodelista

                                            Above: The couple sources ingredients from local businesses like Kinderhook Farm. Photograph by Mikael Kennedy via Gaskins.

                                            Gaskins Restaurant in Germantown | Remodelista

                                            Above: A simple evening table setting. Photograph by Mikael Kennedy via Gaskins.

                                            Gaskins Restaurant in Germantown | Remodelista

                                            Above L: The exterior is painted a dark gray. Above R: A detail of the penny-tiled entryway. Photograph by Mikael Kennedy via Gaskins.

                                            Gaskins in Germantown | Remodelista

                                            Above: The exterior at night. Photograph by Mikael Kennedy via Gaskins.

                                            More Stories from Remodelista


                                              0 0

                                              Inspired by California beach cafes, Alexander Evangelou and James Waterworth of London design firm Alexander Waterworth Interiors bring their own brand of microclimate design Hally’s, a new deli in Parsons Green, in the heart of southwest London. 

                                              Photography by Helen Cathcart

                                              Hally's Parsons Green, limed wood bar with  white Carrara marble top and yellow Tolix chairs | Remodelista

                                              Above: Yellow Tolix stools set the beach tone in the main room, where they're paired with whitewashed bricks and a bar built from limed scaffolding boards.

                                              Hally's Parsons Green, limed wood bar with  white Carrara marble top and yellow Tolix chairs | Remodelista

                                              Above: The Carrara marble countertop is framed with wood.

                                              Hally's Parsons Green, bright and pastel colors | Remodelista

                                              Above: Bright colors mixed with pastels exude a Southern Californian vibe.

                                              Hally's Parsons Green, communal tables with pastel colored dip dyed bentwood chairs | Remodelista

                                              Above: The communal tables are also made from scaffolding boards. (For Corbin Bernsen's bedside shelves from scaffolding, see Backyard Bunkhouse, Hollywood Royal Family Edition.)

                                              Hally's Parsons Green, open storage wood shelves against painted white brick walls | Remodelista

                                              Above: Open shelves fashioned from scaffolding have a pleasing informality.

                                              Hally's Parsons Green, communal tables with pastel colored dip dyed bentwood chairs | Remodelista

                                              Above: Raw bentwood chairs have been carefully dip-dyed in pastels to add color throughout the space. 

                                              Hally's Parsons Green, open storage wood shelves against painted white brick walls | Remodelista

                                              Above: Potted herbs are dotted around the room. 

                                              Hally's Parsons Green, white shiplap and open shelves, blue and white ikat and striped ticking | Remodelista

                                              Above: The white-wood shiplap in the back room is a detail borrowed from beach hut design. See Expert Advice: The Enduring Appeal of Shiplap to get the look. 

                                              Hally's Parsons Green, white shiplap, blue and white ikat and striped ticking | Remodelista

                                              Above: Blue-and-white ikat and ticking fabrics bring a nautical air to the back room. 

                                              Hally's Parsons Green, green wall light fixture with brass detail | Remodelista

                                              Above: Green wall lights with subtle brass details add to the warm glow. (For similar options, see 5 Favorites: Wall Lights for Less Than $125 and Cedar & Moss: A Bright New Lighting Company.)

                                              Hally's Parsons Green, patchwork of blue and white tiles | Remodelista

                                              Above: A patchwork of blue-and-white tiles line the bathroom walls. 

                                              Hally's Parsons Green, open front facade to street | Remodelista

                                              Above: The facade opens up entirely for al fresco dining; in bad weather, the large glazed openings allow light in.

                                              Two years ago, Waterworth Interiors transformed our notions about fish-and-chips shops in its design of Kerbisher & Malt. Planning a trip to London? See City Guides: London for our favorite design haunts.

                                              Below: Hally's is in Parsons Green, in southwest London.

                                              N.B.: This post is an update; the original story ran on July 9, 2012, as part of our issue The Summer Bedroom. 

                                              More Stories from Remodelista


                                                0 0

                                                All spas give a go at calming the senses. But London's Akasha Holistic Wellbeing Centre designed by David Chipperfield Architects is in a luxuriously minimalist class all its own. Crucial ingredient? Lean, clean Carrara marble everywhere.

                                                Photography via Hotel Café Royal, unless noted.

                                                Akasha Spa at Hotel Cafe Royal London designed by David Chipperfield | Remodelista

                                                Above: The steam room is at once austerely modern and ancient looking.

                                                The spa is situated in the lower two floors of the historic landmark Hotel Café Royal just off Piccadilly Circus, which Chipperfield has transformed into one of London's most glamorous places to stay, exquisitely appointed marble bathrooms included.

                                                Chipperfield, not coincidentally, is a master of minimalism: See Best House of the Year.

                                                Marble steam room at the Akasha Spa by David Chipperfield, Hotel Cafe Royal, London | Remodelista

                                                Above: Chipperfield Architects incorporated state-of-the-art equipment by working in collaboration with spa builders 4SeasonsSpa. Photograph via Architizer.

                                                Akasha Spa at Hotel Cafe Royal London designed by David Chipperfield | Remodelista

                                                Above: A private hammam. Akasha offers an international menu of treatments.

                                                Marble wall with steam vents, Akasha Spa at Hotel Cafe Royal London designed by David Chipperfield | Remodelista

                                                Above: The thoughtfully pared-down detailing extends to the Jacuzzi jets. Photograph via Architizer.

                                                Round marble sink at the Akasha Spa in the Hotel Cafe Royal London designed by David Chipperfield | Remodelista

                                                Above: A custom circular marble wash basin with nickel faucets. Photograph via 4SeasonsSpa.

                                                Akasha Spa at Hotel Cafe Royal London designed by David Chipperfield | Remodelista

                                                Above: Treatment room for two with paneled wood ceiling and copper censers.

                                                Marble bath at the Akasha Spa, Hotel Cafe Royal London designed by David Chipperfield | Remodelista

                                                Above: The room comes with a soaking tub.

                                                High-style sauna at the Akasha Spa, Hotel Cafe Royal London designed by David Chipperfield | Remodelista

                                                Above: World's most glamorous sauna? Photograph via 4SeasonsSpa.

                                                High-style sauna at the Akasha Spa by David Chipperfield, Hotel Cafe Royal, London | Remodelista

                                                Above: The design, complete with domed ceiling, is built from hemlock. Photograph via Architizer.

                                                Luxe indoor lap pool at the Akasha Spa at Hotel Cafe Royal London designed by David Chipperfield | Remodelista

                                                Above: A lap pool with ethereal lighting. There's also a Watsu pool—picture relaxation treatments that involve floating—and a well-equipped gym. Photograph via Trip Advisor.

                                                Marble bathroom at the Akasha Spa, Hotel Cafe Royal London designed by David Chipperfield | Remodelista

                                                Above: The marble walls in the spa bathroom—and elsewhere in the hotel—were inspired by the surrounding rusticated façades of Regent Street.

                                                The Akasha Holistic Wellbeing Centre is in the Hotel Caf´eé Royal on Regent Street. 

                                                To see more by David Chipperfield, go to Best House of the Year and have a look at his countryside-inspired Minimalist Furniture Collection.

                                                More Stories from Remodelista


                                                  0 0

                                                  On Monday, we visited Patrick Williams of design-build firm Berdoulat at home in London—see Out with the New: Reinventing the Past in a London Remodel. Today we're exploring his family's home away from London: one of Bath, England's most beloved historic houses, which Williams spent 18 months overhauling. 

                                                  The Georgian townhouse at 5 Pierrepoint Place was built in 1748 as the home of John Wood, the Elder, the designer and town planner behind many of Bath's greatest architectural hits, including the Royal Crescent and the Roman Colosseum-inspired Circus. Purchased in a near derelict state, it's been brought back to life by Williams, a restoration expert, ardent salvage hound—and, now, B&B host: He and and his wife, Neri Kamcili, have dubbed the house Berdoulat & Breakfast and run it as a two-room inn.

                                                  Penguin books library at Berdoulat & Breakfast in Bath, England | Remodelista

                                                  Above: Williams's collection of Penguin paperbacks fills his London living room and the library in Bath. Guests are invited to peruse the stacks on request, but asked to "sit with care on the sofa," an original Hepplewhite.

                                                  English kitchen at Berdoulat & Breakfast in Bath, England | Remodelista

                                                  Above: Williams created the combined kitchen and dining room out of spaces previously used as a dentist's office, Masonic meeting room, and the green room of a neighboring theater among other things. The dining table once stood in the boardroom of his great grandfather's pottery and was the family table at Berdoulat, his childhood home in Southwest France.

                                                  The classic English kitchen at Beroulat & Breakfast, a B&B in Bath, England | Remodelista

                                                  Above: "Keen to keep the original paneling of the walls on show, we decided to design the kitchen around a central island, and to match the molding of the panels in the unit's doors," says Williams. "We have our cabinetmaker friend Marcus to thank for the building of the island. He suggested it be referred to as the kitchen continent rather than island given its scale."

                                                  Brass kitchen taps at Berdoulat & Breakfast in Bath, England | Remodelista

                                                  Above: The vintage taps came from "a wonderful man in Bidford on Avon who restores brassware." 

                                                  Neri Kamcili grew up in Istanbul and offers guests a choice of Turkish or English breakfast.

                                                   Berdoulat & Breakfast, a B&B in Bath, England | Remodelista

                                                  Above: In a corner of the kitchen, an antique rush-seated chair and evidence that Williams and Kamcili's two young children are in residence.

                                                  Wall papered with historic house documents at  Berdoulat & Breakfast in Bath, England | Remodelista

                                                  Above: "A paper trail history of the house from before it was built" patterns the entryway. The documents detail how the house was to be built—"from citing the source of the stone through to the color the windows and front door were to be painted," says Williams. "Our paint color dilemma was solved when we discovered these deeds."

                                                  Berdoulat & Breakfast, a B&B in Bath, England | Remodelista

                                                  Above: The Elder Suite occupies what was originally the kitchen, and has a stone fireplace that once contained the hearth and bread ovens. Note the headboard created from a salvaged fireplace surround.

                                                   Bedroom sitting area at Berdoulat & Breakfast in Bath, England | Remodelista

                                                  Above: The Elder Suite's sitting area and shuttered windows; learn about interior shutters in Janet's Remodeling 101 post.

                                                  Antique four poster bed at  Berdoulat & Breakfast in Bath, England | Remodelista

                                                  Above: A floor-to-ceiling antique four poster in the Linley Suite.

                                                  Wooden coat hangers on a peg rail at Berdoulat-&-Breakfast-Bath-England-Remodelista-4.jpg

                                                  Above: The peg rail, a Remodelista favorite. Go to 11 Favorites to find display-worthy clothes hangers.

                                                   Virgin statue in a guest bathroom at Berdoulat & Breakfast in Bath, England | Remodelista

                                                  Above: An antique stone statue of the Virgin and Child migrated from the couple's London master bedroom to the Linley bath.

                                                  Round bathtub at Berdoulat & Breakfast, a B&B in Bath, England | Remodelista

                                                  Above: The Linley Suite bathroom comes with a circular tub and brass fixtures, towel warmer included. Curious about the benefits of the hanging branches? See Design Sleuth: Instant Spa Bathroom.

                                                  Berdoulat & Breakfast, a B&B in a historic house in Bath England | Remodelista-4.jpg

                                                  Above: The Georgian house, like so many that John Wood designed, has a façade of local gold-colored limestone now known as Bath stone. Go to Berdoulat & Breakfast for more details and reservations.

                                                  More Stories from Remodelista


                                                    0 0

                                                    Could the small town of Bruton in Somerset be England's answer to Marfa? Acclaimed hotel and restaurant At the Chapel opened its doors in 2008, followed last year by Hauser & Wirth's ambitious international arts complex and inn. And now there's Caro, a design store and cafe founded by London creative Natalie Jones.

                                                    Jones discovered Bruton eight years ago, when she fell in love with a local fellow. She's been weekend commuting to Somerset ever since, but her work life remained in London—she did fashion and architecture branding for Winkreative and, before that, trend forecasting at the Future Laboratory and interior styling for magazines. When Hauser & Wirth arrived, she decided to make the move herself and open Caro. "Photographers, artists, chefs, they’re all here. And, thanks to the Hauser & Wirth gallery, it’s also a town that is visited by people from all over the world, so it seemed right for me to set my retail roots down in this spot," says Jones. We plan to make the pilgrimage.

                                                    Photography by Emma Lewis for Caro

                                                    Caro in Somerset I Remodelista

                                                    Above: A peek into the shop from a tile-clad window showing a enamelware by Welsh brand ​Blodwen. Caro occupies three ground-floor roos in an 18th-century stone building, and the Victorian green tiles, Jones tells us, were revealed underneath a layer of cream paint. "All it took was a bit of scrubbing." 

                                                    Caro in Somerset I Remodelista

                                                    Above: An array of household goods, from wire bins to local ceramics and cushions, are displayed on steel-framed plywood shelves made by Paul Vincent. Reading materials are displayed on a Vincent table with a Forbo Marmoleum top and hairpin legs.

                                                    Looking for your own woven pendant lights? See our Design Sleuth post.

                                                    Caro in Somerset I Remodelista

                                                    Above: Desk organizers by Danish design studios Hay and Nomess.

                                                    Caro in Somerset I Remodelista

                                                    Above: The pendant lights in the window are by ​Fritz Fryer. The doors are painted in Down Pipe by Farrow & Ball—because of the historic building's Grade II listing, Jones was required to use distemper.

                                                    Caro in Somerset I Remodelista

                                                    Above: The walls at Caro, including the cafe, shown here, are painted in Farrow & Ball's Pink Ground. Like the magazine display table, the counter/bar area​ has a Forbo Marmoleum top. The oak Copenhague Bar Stools are by Hay. 

                                                    Caro shop in Somerset I Remodelista

                                                    Above: A Copenhague Table CPH30 (plywood with green linoleum top) is pared with J110 Chairs, and  J77 Chairs (black lacquered beech), all by Hay. The lamps are from Rockett St George.

                                                    Caro in Somerset I Remodelista

                                                    Above: The old fireplace niche is decoratively stacked with wood. 

                                                    Caro Founder and Owner in Somerset I Remodelista 

                                                    Above: Caro owner, Natalie Jones, behind her counter offering salted-caramel brownies from Somerset artisanal baker The Bakemonger. The counter is clad in​ Geometric Cube Tiles by ​Mandarin Stone​, and the white Porcelain Ceiling Mounted Fittings are by Thomas Hoof from SCP. Stay tuned: Jones will offer guests a room to rent above the shop later this fall and has a suite in the works for spring. Like the look of her shop? She's also available for interior design commissions.

                                                    Here are three more reasons to visit Somerset: 

                                                    More Stories from Remodelista


                                                      0 0

                                                      We're back in the city after a summer traveling to far-flung places; here's a week of urban living ideas to ease us back into realty.

                                                      Remodelista Urban Life Cover Image via The Portmanteau Press | Remodelista

                                                      Above: Photograph of The Apartment by The Line in NYC via The Portmanteau Press.

                                                      Monday

                                                      Drew Lang Carroll Gardens Townhouse | Remodelista

                                                      Above: Margot visits a Carroll Gardens brownstone in our Architecture & Interiors column.

                                                      Tuesday

                                                      Heidi Swanson Portrait | Remodelista

                                                      Above: In this week's Expert Advice installment, Sarah drops in on 101 Cookbooks doyenne Heidi Swanson's San Francisco kitchen.

                                                      Wednesday

                                                      Muji Electric Kettle | Remodelista

                                                      Above: Alexa rounds up the best countertop appliances for small-space living in our 10 Easy Pieces column.

                                                      Thursday

                                                      Crane Cookware | Remodelista

                                                      Above: We're liking a new line of cast iron pots designed in the UK and manufactured in France; see more in Kitchenware.

                                                      Friday

                                                      Hotel Margot in Barcelona | Remodelista

                                                      Above: Ideas to steal from a new hotel in Spain in our Design Travel section.

                                                      More Stories from Remodelista


                                                        0 0

                                                        Located in the 1930s-era Tea Building in Shoreditch, East London, Lyle's is the first solo venture of James Lowe, a founding member of the Young Turks band of roving chefs that won the Observer Food Award in 2012. Lowe cooked at La Trompette and the Fat Duck before becoming head chef at St. John Bread & Wine. According to B3 Designers, "Our goal was to create a restaurant interior that reflected the era of the Tea Building, which was once owned by the Lipton brand, with a strong reference to British manufacturing and industrial design from the mid 20th century." For more information, go to Lyle's.

                                                        Lyles Restaurant in London | Remodelista

                                                        Above: Light floods the space, courtesy of three giant factory-paned windows.

                                                        Lyles Restaurant in London | Remodelista

                                                        Above: The floor is poured natural concrete; an internal factory window lets in more light.

                                                        Lyles Restaurant in London | Remodelista

                                                        Above: The designers painted the brick walls white and chose reclaimed Ercol stick-back chairs, "a reference to long-lasting, high-quality British design."

                                                        Lyles in London | Remodelista

                                                        Above: Details are simple; repurposed wine bottles as water carafes, for instance. Photographs via Rue Rodier.

                                                        Lyles Restaurant in London | Remodelista

                                                        Above: The concierge desk is fashioned from Iroko wood, in contrast to the waxed oak used elsewhere in the interiors.

                                                        Lyle's Restaurant in London | Remodelista

                                                        Above L: The factory lights were reclaimed from an aerospace factory in Coventry. Above R: The bathroom has a pleasingly retro look.

                                                        Browse our favorite dining establishments in our Restaurant Visit section, and check out Silo in Brighton: A Zero-Waste Restaurant for the Future.  

                                                        More Stories from Remodelista


                                                          0 0

                                                          Bakery owner Dawn Casale and designer Oliver Freundlich have been leaving an enticing trail of crumbs all over Brooklyn since 2006. The third One Girl Cookies outpost—this one in Sunset Park's revitalized Industry City—captures a look Casale calls "modern Mayberry." And it's filled with clever takeaway for home settings.

                                                          Photography by Dana Gallagher.

                                                          One Girl Cookies' newest Brooklyn outpost in Industry City, Sunset Park | Remodelista

                                                          Above: A pegboard rises behind the counter animating the space and supplying easy wall-hung storage and displays, including a George & Willy Kraft Paper Roll.

                                                          "Our directive was to take a 650-square-foot raw concrete manufacturing space and transform it into an inviting cafe," says Freundlich, who collaborated on the project with Emily Lindberg from his office. "As with the other two One Girl outposts, we set out to find the right balance of vintage, modern, and playful." The palette—dominated by bright white and turquoise offset by warm ash counters—takes its cues from One Girl Cookies' greatest hits and serves as a foil to the existing concrete and steel.

                                                          One Girl Cookies in Industry City, Sunset Park, Brooklyn | Remodelista

                                                          Above: The colors continue on the floor, which is patterned with Artistic Tile's Hydraulic Blue tile in matte porcelain. The metal windows were installed during Industry City's recent overhaul—go to Remodeling 101 to get the low-down on Steel Factory-Style Windows and Doors. The white metal hanging lights are Ikea's Foto design, $19.99 each—"32 of them with Cree LED bulbs," says Oliver. "The idea was to create a field of lighting that defines the ceiling plain and conceals ductwork and sprinklers."

                                                          One Girl Cookies in Industry City, Sunset Park, Brooklyn | Remodelista

                                                          Above: Each One Girl Cookies location has an antique display case—this one was found in Brooklyn—and vintage milk glass cake stands collected by Casale.

                                                          One Girl Cookies coffee counter in Industry City, Sunset Park, Brooklyn | Remodelista

                                                          Above: The coffee bar's work counter is made of Corian-like Staron: "very clean look and durable," says Oliver. (Read about solid-surface counters in Remodeling 101.) It's offset by an ash counter in a chevron pattern with a built-in Staron ice basin. The hand sink has a classic restaurant supply gooseneck faucet, the Krowne H-102, widely available for less than $100.

                                                          One Girl Cookies' owners Dawn Casale and David Crofton at their newest Brooklyn outpost in Industry City, Sunset Park | Remodelista

                                                          Above: One Girl Bakery owners, Dawn Casales and David Crofton, met when she hired him to be the company's head baker. (And they discovered Freundlich when they moved into the Brooklyn loft he designed as his first job after graduating from Yale architecture school. The three have been working together ever since.)

                                                          They're shown here seated on banquettes upholstered in Candid, a vinyl from Maharam that, says Freundlich, "had to pass the buttercream test—many before it failed." All of the bakery's millwork is by Matt Hogan of Reliquary Studio, a tenant of Industry City and longtime Freundlich collaborator. Windsor-style Salt Chairs, $129 from DWR, were selected because "they matched our palette exactly." (See more options in the Windsor Chair Revisited.)

                                                          Pendant light in One Girl Cookies' newest Brooklyn outpost in Industry City, Sunset Park | Remodelista

                                                          Above: Freundlich took a high/low approach to the lighting: Beneath the Ikea ceiling pendants, he introduced vintage English industrial lights sourced from 1st Dibs. (Looking for something similiar? Trainspotters may have it.)

                                                          One Girl Cookies' newest Brooklyn outpost in Industry City, Sunset Park | Remodelista

                                                          Above: Each One Girl Cookies outpost features a mural that tells the story of the bakery, the family behind it, and the location. This one is by illustrator Jing Wei. The cake window offers a view of the finishing room, part of the bakery's vast industrial kitchen next door.

                                                          The cookies at One Girl Cookies' newest Brooklyn outpost in Industry City, Sunset Park | Remodelista

                                                          Above:  The cafe's recipes are gathered in the One Girl Cookies cookbook.

                                                          Oliver Freundlich and crew, the design team behind One Girl Cookies' newest Brooklyn outpost in Industry City, Sunset Park | Remodelista

                                                          Above: Oliver Freundlich and Emily Lindberg of Oliver Freundlich Design with Jing Wei in front of her artwork.

                                                          Jing Wei's mural at One Girl Cookies' newest Brooklyn outpost in Industry City, Sunset Park | Remodelista

                                                          Above: "The murals are our way of embedding a sense of place and give cafe-goers something to remember."

                                                          One Girl Cookies' newest Brooklyn outpost in Industry City, Sunset Park | Remodelista

                                                          Above: Pale rose-colored curtains provide "a nod to cafe aesthetics and a little intimacy." One Girl Cookies is located in Industry City's new food hall modeled after Chelsea Food Market. It's at 254 36th Street in Sunset Park, Brooklyn.

                                                          We're longtime fans of Freundlich's work. Have a look at Behind the Scenes: Design Lessons from Julianne Moore and The Ultimate Starter Apartment.

                                                          More Stories from Remodelista


                                                            0 0

                                                            Located on Paseo de Gracia, the nine-room Margot House is the latest lodging addition to the bustling city of Barcelona. Father/daughter team Sandra and Sergio Durany named the hotel for Margot Tenenbaum, the character portrayed by Gwyneth Paltrow in Wes Anderson's film The Royal Tenenbaums. According to the duo, Margot's coolly detached and glamorous persona sets the tone for the look of the hotel.

                                                            Judging from the interiors, it's no surprise that both owners come from a design background—Sergio owns Natura, a chain of eco-friendly lifestyle stores, and Sandra runs a fashion and accessories stores called Be. The look of the hotel, which was designed by Vanskap Studio, is minimal, with a Scandinavian and Japanese aesthetic—all white walls, polished concrete floors and countertop surfaces, and pale wood furnishings. The designers sourced most of the furniture locally from AAO; lighting is from Barcelona-based Santa & Cole, and the wool blankets and pillows are from Teixidors.

                                                            Margot House in Barelona, Lobby I Remodelista 

                                                            Above: The large lobby is illuminated by skylights. Several seating areas offer guests plenty of mingling opportunities. 

                                                            Margot House in Barelona, Lobby I Remodelista

                                                            Above: At the end of the lobby, guests can find a curated library of design journals. 

                                                            Margot House in Barelona, Lobby I Remodelista 

                                                            Above: A large table in the lobby is surrounded by folding canvas director's chairs; hanging planters add a note of greenery. Here are 10 more Folding Chairs to consider.

                                                            Hotel Margot Kitchen | Remodelista

                                                            Above: A communal kitchen is available for guests.

                                                            Margot House in Barcelona I Remodelista

                                                            Above: A simple table is set for guests to enjoy freshly brewed coffee and hot tea. 

                                                            Margot Housel in Barelona I Remodelista 

                                                            Above: A light and airy guest room has an en suite bathtub. The table lamp is Cestita by Miquel Milá for Santa & Cole. For more, see 10 Baths in the Bedroom

                                                            Margot House in Barelona I Remodelista 

                                                            Above: Half of this guest bedroom wall is covered in wainscoting. The Bassols linens are made from Egyptian cotton, and the coverlets and throw pillows are wool from Teixidors. A butterfly chair occupies one corner of the room.

                                                            Margot House in Barelona I Remodelista 

                                                            Above: A long bench offers additional seating (with storage baskets underneath and a clothing rack), and a linen roman shade provides privacy or lets light into the bathroom. 

                                                            Margot-House-Barcelona-07-Remodelista.jpg

                                                            Above: A sparse guest room with oak furnishings gives the room a Japanese feel.

                                                            Margot House in Barelona I Remodelista

                                                            Above: A double vanity was made using a Parsons table, two white sinks, and two faucets. 

                                                            Margot House in Barelona I Remodelista

                                                            Above: This small guest bath features plastered walls, a double-faucet vanity, a square brass mirror, and two black wall scones.

                                                            Margot House in Barelona I Remodelista 

                                                            Above: An interior window (opening) was added to the wall between this bathroom and bedroom, adding light to the bathroom.  

                                                            Margot Houes in Barelona I Remodelista

                                                            Above: A built-in hotel shop.

                                                            Margot House Barcelona I Remodelista

                                                            Above: Septimo, a Barcelona-based agency, created Margot House's branding material. 

                                                            For more in Barcelona, check out: 

                                                            More Stories from Remodelista


                                                              0 0

                                                              Our friends at And North clued us into the newly opened Brunette Wine Bar in downtown Kingston, New York. Owners Jamie (a graphic designer) and Tracy Kennard (a brand consultant) conceived the project as a way to spend more time in the area. We're on board.

                                                              Photography by Katie Lobel via And North.

                                                              Brunette Wine Bar in the Hudson Valley | Remodelista

                                                              Above: Feminine (an ornate mirror) meets masculine (plumbing pipe shelves).

                                                              Brunette Wine Bar in the Hudson Valley | Remodelista

                                                              Above: The natural wines are sourced from local producers.

                                                              Brunette Wine Bar in the Hudson Valley | Remodelista

                                                              Above: Tracy Kennard at the bar.

                                                              Brunette Wine Bar in the Hudson Valley | Remodelista

                                                              Above: Classic bentwood chairs and detailing evoke a Parisian feel.

                                                              Brunette Wine Bar in the Hudson Valley | Remodelista

                                                              Above: A brick wall is whitewashed to offset the wine offerings.

                                                              Brunette Wine Bar in the Hudson Valley | Remodelista

                                                              Above: The bathroom walls are hung with framed photos of famous brunettes.

                                                              On the other coast, another favorite local pub is Mill Valley Beerworks.

                                                              More Stories from Remodelista


                                                                0 0

                                                                Proof that it pays to wander: This past June, on the last day of a quick trip to Berlin, I rounded a corner in the Mitte and made my favorite discovery of the week: Laden, a just opened (that morning) cafe and furniture showroom with a lush vegetable garden out back. A collaboration between the Lokal restaurant team and furniture makers Buchholz Berlin, Laden is a showroom for Buchholz's rustic tables, stools, cutting boards, and wooden bowls, as well as a cafe serving flatbreads, wine, and afternoon coffee. 

                                                                Katja Buchholz, the architect and designer behind Buchholz Berlin (she's also worked in the Berlin office of David Chipperfield), had been on the hunt for a location to showcase her line of furniture and accessories made from "regionally available materials," as she says, when she discovered the space. "Our wood is sourced locally and we use bio-tanned leather from the Bavarian alps and recycled metal from a local metal worker." Pieces are available to buy right off the floor or to order; see the range at Buchholz Berlin

                                                                Photography by Dirk Lange, unless otherwise noted.

                                                                Restaurant

                                                                Buchholz Shop in Berlin | Remodelista

                                                                Above: The cafe is located in a 1780-listed building; the design team unearthed original wall murals of the Ballhaus during the renovation.

                                                                Buchholz Berlin Cafe | Remodelista

                                                                Above (L to R): A simple counter where lunch is served; a rustic tabletop; photographs via Anne Li West.

                                                                Buchholzber Cafe in Berlin | Remodelista

                                                                Above: A table set for lunch.

                                                                Buccholzberlin Cafe in Berlin | Remodelista

                                                                Above: A vintage copper trough serves as a wine cooler.

                                                                Buchholzber Cafe in Berlin | Remodelista

                                                                Above: Double doors open directly onto the vegetable garden.

                                                                Buchholzberlin Garden in Berlin | Remodelista

                                                                Above: The rustic outdoor dining table is surrounded by a suite of folding Piana chairs, designed by David Chipperfield for Alessi; $225 each at Design Within Reach. Photograph via AnneLiWest Berlin.

                                                                BuchholzBerlin Wine Garden | Remodelista

                                                                Above: Five raised garden beds made from domestic oak planks are planted with kohlrabi, kale, cabbage, chard, and fennel, which appear on the daily menu.

                                                                Buchholzberlin Garden in Berlin | Remodelista

                                                                Above: Vegetable harvesting. Photograph via AnneLiWest Berlin.

                                                                Shop

                                                                Buccholz Table | Remodelista

                                                                Above: The Sauener Forestry Table starts at €2,590 ($2,902).

                                                                Buchholz Berlin Hocker Stools | Remodelista

                                                                Above: The Tripod Stools are €90 ($101) each; buy three or more and you get a discount. 

                                                                Buchholz Ash Tray | Remodelista

                                                                Above: Prices for the Ash Trays start at €59 ($66).

                                                                Buchholz Cedar Board | Remodelista

                                                                Above: The Cedar Board-a-Porter is €49 ($55).

                                                                Buchholzberlin Bowls | Remodelista 

                                                                Above: Prices for Beech Wood Bowls start at €9 ($10).

                                                                Laden, located at 20 Joachim Strasse, in the Mitte district of Berlin, and is open Tuesday through Saturday, noon until 8 p.m. For more ideas, see our Insider's Guide: 14 Don't-Miss Restaurants, Coffee Shops, and Cocktail Bars in Berlin.

                                                                More Stories from Remodelista


                                                                  0 0

                                                                  Located in an old warehouse space in Richmond, Australia, a suburb of Melbourne, Patch Cafe serves a Paleo-inspired menu (think meat, fish, veg, fruit; what early humans ate) in a simple, unpretentious space with more than a few raw edges. Cofounders Tom Davidson and Jacob Burke turned to interior designers Hana Hakim and Kestie Lane (former partners in the Melbourne-based Studio You Me) to transform the raw industrial space, with its exposed brickwork, arched steel windows, and soaring ceilings, into an intimate dining spot. "Our challenges included a long, narrow space and a fixed budget," Hakim says. "We pulled it off by using inexpensive building materials combined with custom finishes and joinery." Here's a glimpse of the creative space. 

                                                                  Photography by Tom Blachford.

                                                                  Patch Cafe in Melbourne I Remodelista

                                                                  Above: Guests can peek into the cafe through a newly opened black steel facade (which was tied in with the old existing wall and structure), creating a sense of transparency. The patchwork pattern of tiles on the rear wall adds a playful note.

                                                                  Patch Cafe in Melbourne I Remodelista

                                                                  Above: "The central canopy structure that houses the open bar and live kitchen was designed as an integrated installation that provides a lower anchor for the eye and an ‘activity hub’ for operations," Hakim says. The bar is made from Azzura blue honed marble and features simple wooden shelving. The barstools were painted a custom lacquer shade of green. 

                                                                  Patch cafe in Melbourne I Remodelista

                                                                  Above: "To create a sense of intimacy, we created a feature wall out of inexpensive black builder's wire mesh, which gives the walls a graphic and industrial touch", says Hakim. "We hung fun, quirky, and functional objects from the wall to add visual interest," Hakim says. 

                                                                  Patch Cafe in Melbourne I Remodelista

                                                                  Above: Furnishings are custom-made from plywood and stained in a whitewash finish to bring out the grain of the raw timber. The lighting is by TossB.

                                                                  Patch Cafe in Melbourne I Remodelista

                                                                  Above: The waiters' station is constructed from cement sheet, concrete, and wood, with a lab sink and tap fittings by Astra Walker

                                                                  Patch Cafe in Melbourne I Remodelista

                                                                  Above: The large arched steel window provides abundant light to the narrow space. The built-in seating is upholstered in heavy-duty fabric to offset the soft hues of the space. 

                                                                  Patch Cafe in Melbourne I Remodelista

                                                                  Above: The plywood scalloped shingle canopy above the bar area imparts a village vibe to the industrial warehouse space. A geometric pattern of soft blue, black, and gray tiles creates a whimsical backdrop to the bar. 

                                                                  For more on Melbourne:

                                                                  More Stories from Remodelista


                                                                    0 0

                                                                    Cue the cigar smoke and the gold watch chains. Master set designers Roman and Williams have recast the grand Chicago Athletic Association on Michigan Avenue—right across from Millennium Park—as a playfully posh hotel, Venetian-gothic details intact. Look no further for the perfect place to hole up on Halloween weekend.

                                                                    Photography via the Chicago Athletic Association Hotel, except where noted.

                                                                    Chicago Athletic Association Hotel | Remodelista

                                                                    Above: Once a gathering spot for Wrigleys, Fields, and Spaldings, the 1890s building was designed by Henry Ives Cobb. Shuttered in recent years, it came close to having all but its facade demolished. Owners Commune Hotels & Resorts hired Chicago firm Hartshorne Plunkard Architecture to oversee the restoration, and Roman and Williams to inject the rooms with new life. Shown here, the pleasingly time-warped drawing room.

                                                                    Chicago Athletic Association | Remodelista

                                                                    Above: A reading room with original paneling and stained glass. Photograph via HPA Architecture.

                                                                    Chicago Association Hotel | Remodelista

                                                                    Above: The structure was built during the city's renaissance years spurred by the Columbian Exposition of 1893. The club only allowed women on Wednesday nights and Sunday afternoons until 1972, and was closed in 1997, but left largely intact. Photograph by Nick Fochtman via Chicago Curbed.

                                                                    Chicago Athletic Association Hotel | Remodelista

                                                                    Above: Window seating and tête-à-tête tables. Photograph by Nick Fochtman via Chicago Curbed.

                                                                    Monogrammed doorknobs at the Chicago Athletic Association Hotel designed by Roman & Williams | Remodelista

                                                                    Above: Monogrammed knobs on a lacquered wardrobe in a guest room. 

                                                                    Chicago Athletic Association Hotel | Remodelista

                                                                    Above: The 241 rooms have custom metal bed frames and Faribault Woolen Mill blankets woven with the quote: "I miss everything about Chicago except January and February." 

                                                                    Chicago Athletic Association Hotel | Remodelista

                                                                    Above: Referencing old-school gym equipment, Roman and Williams designed desks inspired by wooden stretching racks and pommel-horse-shaped benches. Here and there they also inserted cheeky paintings. "A touch of disorder within the order keeps a space fresh," say the designers. (Go to 10 Favorites: Vintage Gym Equipment as Decor for more.) "

                                                                    Chicago Athletic Association Hotel | Remodelista

                                                                    Above L: The racks are cleverly hung with leather storage pouches. Above R: A preserved floor monogram incorporates a fencer's foil. 

                                                                    Chicago Athletic Association Hotel | Remodelista

                                                                    Above: Bathrooms have Carrara marble and nickel vanities and classic black-and-white porcelain tiles with dark grout. Guest robes are boxing-robe-inspired. Photograph by Nick Fochtman via Chicago Curbed.

                                                                    The roof restaurant at the Chicago-Athletic-Association-Hotel-designed-by-Roman-and-Williams-Remodelista-3.jpg

                                                                    Above: The top-floor restaurant, Cindy's, is in a new greenhouse-like addition, modeled after the botanical garden glass houses of the 19th century. "The space is a romantic notion of what might have been on this site before the wave of development swept the fields by the lake," say Roman and Williams.

                                                                    The Chicago Athletic Association Hotel  | Remodelista

                                                                    Above: The newly restored Venetian-gothic building rises for 13 stories. It's located at 12 S. Michigan Avenue overlooking Millennium Park. Go to the Chicago Athletic Association Hotel for full details.

                                                                    For another Roman and Williams design in a dramatic historic building, take a look at New York's High Line Hotel in Chelsea. Heading to Chicago? Peruse our city guide for more finds.

                                                                    More Stories from Remodelista


                                                                      0 0

                                                                      The Day of the Dead is every day at Hueso. Part crypt, part Joseph Cornell–style assemblage, the concept restaurant (whose name means "bone") is an artfully spooky collaboration between chef-provocateur Alfonso Cadena and his architect brother Ignacio of Cadena & Asiocados. Ignacio stripped the interior and, with the help of local artists, covered it with a collage of skeletal fragments. Located in the Lafayette Design District of Guadalajara, Mexico, the canteen occupies a resurrected 1940s structure, formerly the home/studio of architect Diaz Morales and now part of the Luis Barragán Foundation—and itself equally eye opening. 

                                                                      Photography by Jaime Navarro via Architizer, unless otherwise noted.

                                                                      Hueso restaurant in Guadalajara, Mexico, designed by Cadena Asociados | Remodelista

                                                                      Above: Eucalyptus provides a sign of life in the chalky white dining room where everything from human and animal bones to molcajetes (mortar and pestles) are part of the fossilized display.

                                                                      Hueso restaurant in Guadalajara, Mexico, designed by Cadena Asociados | Remodelista

                                                                      Above: A stepped communal table extends the length of the 240-square-foot space, surrounded by classic Thonet hairpin chairs. The white tiles on the floor are a continuation of the exterior of the building (see below).

                                                                      Hueso restaurant in Guadalajara, Mexico | Remodelista

                                                                      Above: The whitewashed walls are an ode to the elemental, and include, according to Ignacio, 10,000 bones organized in a grid of wooden frames and shadowboxes.

                                                                      Hueso restaurant in Guadalajara, Mexico, designed by Cadena Asociados | Remodelista

                                                                      Above L: Chef Alfonso Cadena, 29, grew up in Mexico City and got his training at the Culinary Institute of America. Above R: An aluminum backbone holds the orders of the day. Photographs via Yatzer.

                                                                      Hueso restaurant in Guadalajara, Mexico, designed by Cadena Asociados | Remodelista

                                                                      Above: The long, narrow room has a bleached bar table (right) and the kitchen opens behind it. Photograph via Designboom

                                                                      Hueso restaurant in Guadalajara, Mexico, designed by Cadena Asociados | Remodelista

                                                                      Above: In the chapel-like back of the room, a dead tree rises and casts interesting shadows. Photograph via Designboom

                                                                      Hueso restaurant in Guadalajara, Mexico, designed by Cadena Asociados | Remodelista

                                                                      Above: Cooking implements and a bucket of bones adorn the area around stairs.

                                                                      Bone decor at Hueso restaurant by Ignacio Cadana | Remodelista

                                                                      Above: In the entry, a display case is filled with aluminum castings of ribs, vertebrae, and other fragments.

                                                                      Hueso restaurant by Ignacio Cadena | Remodelista

                                                                      Above: The 1940s building is covered in "a skin" of ceramic tiles decorated with stitching patterns. That's a bone hanging over the door.

                                                                      The black-and-white tiled exterior of Hueso restaurant in Guadalajara, Mexico | Remodelista

                                                                      Above: Hueso is in Guadalaja's Lafayette District, at 2061 Efraín González Luna.

                                                                      Kindred spirit? Take a look at Bones, a gastropub in Paris.

                                                                      More Stories from Remodelista


                                                                        0 0

                                                                        We recently featured Archiplan Studio's Minimalist Intervention of a Wallpaper-Filled Villa Outside Milan. Today, we're visiting LaCucina, Archiplan's clean-lined but soulful restaurant design in their hometown of Mantua. The mandate? To convert an existing historic space into a dining room that puts people at ease. 

                                                                        Photography by Gianni Basso/Vega MG via Archiplan Studio.

                                                                        The modern Italian dining room: Ristorante LaCucina in Mantua, Italy, designed by Archiplan Studio | Remodelista

                                                                        Above: "We worked closely with the owners of the restaurant to develop a peaceful space that would make diners feel as if they were guests in a private home," write architects Cisi Diego and Stefano Gorni Silvestrini of Archiplan. Like the menu, the decor is a fresh take on local classics.

                                                                        The New Italian Dining Room: Ristorante LaCucina in Mantua designed by Archiplan Studio | Remodelista

                                                                        Above: The designers preserved the space's original timber ceiling and paired it with plywood paneling bleached with hydrogen peroxide and an oak floor lightened through a process of removing the tannins. The white-topped tables and benches are sawn oak custom-made by Visual.

                                                                        The New Italian Dining Room: Ristorante LaCucina in Mantua designed by Archiplan Studio | Remodelista

                                                                        Above: The beams cradle the main room, and family-style tables and open shelving create a relaxed vibe. The white chairs are Piero Lissoni's Neve (Snow) design from Porro in stained ash.

                                                                        The New Italian Dining Room: Ristorante LaCucina in Mantua designed by Archiplan Studio | Remodelista

                                                                        Above: An intimate end of the restaurant features a butcher-shop-style stainless steel counter and subway-tiled wall. Decorative ductwork is a theme throughout. Here, the designers installed a duct chandelier, a collaboration between Cisi and Elia Pavesi and Nicola Pianori of ENDS Studio. Yellow paper placemats introduce a touch of color to the palette of pale wood and white paint.

                                                                        The New Italian Dining Room: Ristorante LaCucina in Mantua designed by Archiplan Studio | Remodelista

                                                                        Above L: The over-the-counter lighting is Archiplan's Lampada 00, designed "through a process of subtraction." Above R: The restaurant's subtle sign made of scrapwood. 

                                                                        The New Italian Dining Room: Ristorante LaCucina in Mantua designed by Archiplan Studio | Remodelista

                                                                        Above: Modern ductwork meets old and new wood in a corner of the restaurant with intimate seating. Diego and Gorni Silvestrini say their designs are always about "attempting to synthesize oppositional forces, such as strength and fragility, shadow and light, the perfect and the imperfect."

                                                                        Ristorante LaCucina in Mantua designed by Archiplan Studio | Remodelista

                                                                        Above: The design extends to the table signs. 

                                                                        Steel bathroom sink by Archiplan Studio in Mantua, Italy | Remodelista

                                                                        Above: Lavello 17, Archiplan's stainless steel sink, "fulfills the function of the countertop" and includes a wall-hung pivoting soap dispenser.

                                                                        Ristorante LaCucina in Mantua designed by Archiplan Studio | Remodelista

                                                                        Above: Lampado 5054, Archiplan's homage to the incandescent bulb, sits in the window. 

                                                                        LaCucina in Mantua, Italy | Remodelista

                                                                        Above: LaCucina is at 17 Via Guglielmo Oberdan, a quiet cobblestoned side street in Mantua. 

                                                                        For more by Archiplan, take a look at A Moody Loft and Casa Errepi.

                                                                        More Stories from Remodelista


                                                                          0 0

                                                                          Tyler Hays of BDDW is broadening his horizon (again). He recently launched M. Crow & Co. in Oregon, and now he's taking his American handcrafted furniture collection across the Atlantic to a new showroom in Milan. He's displaying his own luxe-rustic timeless pieces alongside lighting by Lindsey Adelman, David Weeks, and Apparatus Studios.

                                                                          In a recent interview with the Wall Street Journal, Hays admitted that he's counting on the showroom less as a revenue stream than as an excuse to visit Italy more often. We can't help but agree with his excuse. 

                                                                          Here's a glimpse of the light-filled showroom. 

                                                                          BDDW in Milan I Remodelista

                                                                          Above: A linen dress hanging in the Milan showroom window.

                                                                          BDDW in Milan I Remodelista

                                                                          Above: Hays and his collaborators' names hand-drawn on a linen dress. 

                                                                          BDDW in Milan I Remodelista

                                                                          Above: The Cloud Shelf and hand-painted Ceramic Bricks—all designed and made in Hays's studio in Philadelphia.

                                                                          BDDW in Milan I Remodelista

                                                                          Above: A BDDW handcrafted Dining Table, with lighting by Lindsey Adelman and Apparatus Studio and a large vintage mural on display as a backdrop

                                                                          BDDW in Milan I Remodelista

                                                                          Above: Handmade, hand-painted Ceramic Trivets hang on the wall next to a painting by Hays. The Ceramic Funnel Lamps are by Natalie Page, an Abel Sofa is paired with a round coffee table, and the Firewood Holder (includes a bundle of scrap wood from the BDDW workshop) can be seen in the background. To learn about the Wingback Chair by BDDW, see our post 10 Easy Pieces: The Wingback Chair Is Back

                                                                          BDDW in Milan I Remodelista

                                                                          Above: An Abel Club Chair, Credenzas, and a large Leather Round Mirror on display in one of the rooms—all designed by BDDW. The light fixture is by Lindsey Adelman.

                                                                          BDDW in Milan I Remodelista

                                                                          Above: A Hanging Mobile on display by David Weeks.

                                                                          More on BDDW straight from our archives:

                                                                          More Stories from Remodelista


                                                                            0 0

                                                                            We first learned about French designer Elodie Laléous and her bed linens and furniture collection a few years back. This year she decided to open up a brick and mortar store of Lab Boutique, a new home goods shop located in the 9th Arrondissement of Paris (in the neighborhood South Pigalle). Laléous moved to Paris in 2005, and after completing her studies at the IFM (Institut Français de la Mode), she landed a job as a visual merchandiser for Chloé and later moved on to work for A.P.C. "I decided to work for brands that I love and share their values. Their collections are functional, comfortable, and timeless—a philosophy I believe in for my own brand," Laléous says. Lab boutique offers French bed linens, Kvadrat wool cushions, baby linens made from Liberty of London's cotton lawn, home goods from Hay, and enamelware by Austrian Riess. Here's a glimpse of the newly opened Lab Boutique in Paris. 

                                                                            Photography by Aurélie Deglane via her blog Lili in Wonderland.  

                                                                            Lab Boutique in Paris I Remodelista

                                                                            Above: The Lab Boutique storefront is painted a dark navy blue (Laléous's favorite color). The vintage bike was added as a friendly invitation to come say hello.

                                                                            Lab Boutique Paris- I Remodelista

                                                                            Above: "Our bed linens are sewn in France and come in our very own exclusive colors," says Laléous. Made from 100 percent linen, the bedding is yarn-dyed (won't wash out) and very soft. The fabric is weaved in Lithuania, and the pieces are sewed in Cambrai (north of Paris). The Linen Duvet (shown in Stone Blue) is offered in several colors, comes in four sizes, and costs €82.50 ($91). The Coussin Kvadrat Damier Corail (a coral check cushion made from Kvadrat fabric mixed with Lab Boutique's own linen) costs €49,17 ($54.25), the Indigo Pillow Case comes in two sizes and costs €27.14 ($30), the Liberty Babylon Cushion (floral pattern cushion) costs €29.17 ($32), and the Light Pink Linen Quilt costs €132.50 ($146). The Wooden Olive Board is made in Tunisia and the Navy Socks come from Portugal. In the bedroom, painted in Farrow & Ball's Down Pipe, a wall was built to separate the space from the living room to make it feel like a real home. 

                                                                            Lab Boutique Paris- I Remodelista

                                                                            Above:  The hanging aprons, made by Lab Boutique, are worn by the staff. A bright Hay Lounge Chair and a Liberty Chive Cushion is placed in a living room corner. "When I discovered Hay, I immediately fell in love with their designs—their products are high quality, functional, minimal, and come in great colors. This chair was first designed for the Copenhagen university," says Laléous. On the table sits one of Elodie's favorite picture books: A Year of Mornings: 3,191 Miles Apart by American photographers Maria Alexandra Vettese and Stephanie Congdon Barnes. The floral wallpaper (a Remodelista favorite) is Sandberg's Raphael Blue. "In France, home textile stores are quite boring, so I wanted to show that decorating with textiles can be very modern, too. The idea of the store is that everything is for sale, not only the textiles, but also the wallpaper," Laléous adds.

                                                                            Lab Boutique Paris- I Remodelista

                                                                            Above: The accessories (a ruler, kaleido trays, notebooks, a wooden spinning top) on the desk are by Hay. The vase is made by Lenneke Wispelwey, a Dutch ceramist. "The String shelving system is functional, takes minimal space, and looks beautiful in any room," adds Laléous.

                                                                            Lab Boutique Paris- I Remodelista

                                                                            Above: On display, the Lab Boutique Linen Bedding Collection (duvet covers, fitted sheets, flat sheets, pillow cases) in different colors. Custom sizing is offered and costs an additional €10 ($11). The bright colors (Indigo, Mustard, Coral) are inspired by the work of Le Corbusier and Charlotte Perrian. Lab Boutique also offers Custom-Dyed Linens in Farrow & Ball Colors (the Black/Navy Duvet Cover comes from their Hague paint color).

                                                                            Lab Boutique Paris- I Remodelista

                                                                            Above: The kitchen is made from Ikea shelving and a vintage buffet sourced online from La Petite Brocanteuse. The wooden shelves were custom built. The kitchen cabinets are painted in Down Pipe and the walls are painted in Parma Gray, both colors by Farrow & Ball. "Our walls are very tall at the shop. To make the store more cozy and look like a real flat, we kept a white band at the top of the walls. I really love the two-toned walls, it reminds me of my school. I realized they used to do that a lot in the sixties," says Laléous.

                                                                            Lab Boutique Paris- I Remodelista

                                                                            Above: The Olive Dishes are made in Tunisia, and the Enamelware is by Austrian company Riess.

                                                                            Lab Boutique Paris- I Remodelista

                                                                            Above: The enamel sink and the vanity are vintage and found from La Petite Brocanteuse. The shower curtain and hand towel are made from a Japanese cotton/hemp fabric, featuring a selvage edge in red and navy. "Our collection is inspired by fashion and this is a good example of the bridge I make between home textiles and fashion: A selvage edge is used on A.P.C. denims and visible when you roll up the pant leg," says Laléous. The Morocco-made cement tiles are designed by a small new French company called Bahya, and the wall color is Parma Gray by Farrow & Ball. 

                                                                            For more on Paris, make sure to check out:

                                                                            More Stories from Remodelista


                                                                              0 0

                                                                              Turns out, a touch of dark suits the City of Light. Take a look at Dorothée Meilichzon's navy-inflected Art Deco design for the resurrected Hotel Bachaumont in Sentier in the 2ème (within strolling distance of the Louvre). 

                                                                              Photography by Paul Bowyer.

                                                                              Hotel Bachaumont in Paris designed by Dorothee Meilichzon | Remodelista

                                                                              Above: Situated in a turn-of-the-20th century building near Les Halles, the hotel is in its second incarnation: A happening place to stay in the twenties, it was later occupied by a medical clinic. Now owned by Samy Marciano of La Clé Group, it recently reopened as a hotel after a three-year renovation.

                                                                              Hotel Bachaumont in Paris designed by Dorothee Meilichzon | Remodelista

                                                                              Above: Taking inspiration from the hotel's origins, Melichzon and her team at Chzon took a glam retro tack starting in the lobby. 

                                                                              Hotel Bachaumont in Paris designed by Dorothee Meilichzon | Remodelista

                                                                              Above: Playful combinations of black, white, and blue surface in every room. Most of the furnishings and fittings are custom designed. 

                                                                               The restaurant at Hotel Bachaumont in Paris | Remodelista

                                                                              Above: The hotel's skylit restaurant incorporates backgammon-inspired tabletops, multi-patterned chairs, and navy banquettes. Breakfast for hotel guests is served here; there's also a separate cocktail bar.

                                                                              Hotel Bachaumont Paris | Remodelista

                                                                              Above L and R: The room is detailed with brass bracketed shelves and sconces and an upholstered wall. The lineup of mirrors echoes the lines of the paneling opposite them.

                                                                              Hotel Bachaumont in Paris designed by Dorothee Meilichzon | Remodelista

                                                                              Above: The Bachaumont has its own Versailles-style hall of mirrors. 

                                                                              Hotel Bauchaumont in Paris | Remodelista

                                                                              Above: Melichzon specializes in hotel design and is known for her inventive upholstered headboards. There are 49 rooms at the Bachaumont, all in a spectrum of blues. 

                                                                              Hotel Bauchaumont in Paris | Remodelista

                                                                              Above: Each room has a wall-mounted wooden desk, herringbone floor, and brass-accented globe lights. (For lighting that's similar in spirit, see the designs of LA's Atelier de Troupe.)

                                                                              Hotel Bauchaumont in Paris | Remodelista

                                                                              Above L and R: An executive room with a green-and-white tiled bath.

                                                                              Hotel Bachaumont in Paris designed by Dorothee Meilichzon | Remodelista

                                                                              Above: A living room suite with marble shelving that incorporates a bar sink. 

                                                                              Hotel-Bachaumont-Paris-Dorothee-Meilichzon-design-Remodelista-6.jpg

                                                                              Above: A bathroom for two with a harlequin floor and hex-tiled walls in Suite Bachaumont.

                                                                              Hotel-Bachaumont-Paris-Dorothee-Meilichzon-design-Remodelista-6.jpg

                                                                              Above: The room also has a claw-foot tub in a tiled niche.

                                                                                 Hotel Bachaumont in Paris | Remodelista

                                                                              Above: Hotel Bachaumont is well-situated in the heart of Paris.

                                                                              Taking a trip? Here are three more hotels in our Paris address book:

                                                                              More Stories from Remodelista


                                                                                0 0

                                                                                Stylist Vanessa Traina Snow specializes in conjuring fantasy worlds; in New York, she made her mark by masterminding online lifestyle shop The Line and its offline counterpart, The Apartment, a fully furnished SoHo loft where everything, down to the Italian toothpaste in the bathroom, happens to be for sale.

                                                                                Now she and creative director Melanie Glass have applied the concept to a laid-back luxe apartment on Melrose Place in LA. Consider it the design equivalent of a tasteful page turner.

                                                                                Photography via The Line.

                                                                                The Apartment in Los Angeles | Remodelista

                                                                                Above: A fiddle leaf fig flourishes amid Scandi modern classics in The Apartment's bedroom. The light is Greta Grossman's Grasshopper Floor Lamp, $898, and that's an Icelandic Sheepskin from Black Sheep (White Light); $220. 

                                                                                The Apartment LA by The Line | Remodelista

                                                                                Above: The furnishings are a mix of contemporary and vintage; shown above is an Alvar Aalto table surround by a quartet of Original 68 chairs. Yes, even the drinking glass is for sale—it's made by artisans in Yachiyo, Japan; $11. The Black Glass Bowl, $195, is by Georg Jensen. 

                                                                                The Line in Los Angeles | Remodelista

                                                                                Above: The idea behind The Apartment is to create a shopable fantasy—all goods and furnishings are available straight off the floor and via online retailer The Line. The wicker and steel lounge chairs are Poul Kjærholm's PK22 by Fritz Hansen; $4,108 each.

                                                                                The Apartment for the Line in LA | Remodelista

                                                                                Above: Danielle would approve: Books crop up in most of the rooms; the Five-Volume Jean Prouvé Monograph is $225.

                                                                                The Apartment in Los Angeles | Remodelista

                                                                                Above: A reading area opens off the formal living room.

                                                                                The Apartment for the Line in LA | Remodelista

                                                                                Above: The Apartment made its debut just last week, and many of it furnishings, including this armchair and set of nesting tables, are still being added to its online shop. Mission statement: "The vision of The Line stems from a desire to pare back, strip down, and pull together the search for refined, versatile, and honest goods."

                                                                                The Apartment in Los Angeles | Remodelista

                                                                                Above: A trio of matte vases in the living room.

                                                                                The Apartment LA by The Line | Remodelista

                                                                                Above: Bench seating and storage in a corner of the kitchen. The Two-Toned Cotton Pillows—cream on one side, charcoal on the other, and stitched in NYC—are part of The Line's own housewares collection, Tenfold; $95 for the 16-by-16-inch size, down insert included.

                                                                                Go to 10 Easy Pieces for more examples of under-the-bench kitchen storage.

                                                                                The Apartment in LA by The Line | Remodelista

                                                                                Above: As in The Line's New York loft, the kitchen is fully outfitted and has a long marble-topped table where customers sit down with salespeople to make purchases.

                                                                                The Apartment in Los Angeles | Remodelista

                                                                                Above: A stone countertop runs the length of the kitchen. The chromogenic print is by LA artist Mona Kuhn.

                                                                                The Line in Los Angeles | Remodelista

                                                                                Above: The bedroom has a black-and-white theme. The Two-Toned Linen Throw Pillows, $135, are part of the Tenfold collection, as is the black Washed Linen Duvet; $498. The framed prints are by György Kepes.

                                                                                The Apartment in Los Angeles | Remodelista

                                                                                Above: The bed frame is the Eden, designed for The Line by LA furniture maker Doug McCollough of DMDM. On the bedside table: Susanne Kaufmann's Calming Pillow Spray from Austria; $28.

                                                                                The Apartment LA by The Line | Remodelista

                                                                                Above: The bedroom's en suite soaking tub is one of the few things not for sale. Intrigued by the glass chandelier? See our recent High/Low post. The Apartment is on the second floor of 8463 Melrose Place; go to The Line to see more.

                                                                                Explore The Line's New York apartment in a SoHo Dream Loft (Where Everything Is for Sale)

                                                                                More Stories from Remodelista


                                                                                  0 0

                                                                                  Located in the Dutch Kills area of Long Island City (across the East River from New York City's Midtown), the newly opened Boro Hotel is the kind of hotel we can get behind, with just the right mix of novel design solutions (cinderblocks, pallet wood, and color-blocked paint) and modern furnishings (from Hay, Muuto, Plumen, and Tom Dixon to name a few).

                                                                                  The hotel and its 108 guest rooms were designed by architects Matthew Grzywinski and Amador Pons of Grzywinski & Pons; most of the rooms feature broad industrial steel windows for views of the New York City skyline. Some say Long Island City is the new Brooklyn. If that's the case, you can bet Boro Hotel is the Wythe Hotel equivalent.

                                                                                  Boro Hotel in Long Island City, New York | Remodelista

                                                                                  Above: A monochromatic conference table surrounded by J104 Chairs and J110 Chairs, both in gray, by Danish design studio Hay. A pair of Tom Dixon Offcut Stools sits in front and a wall of original cinderblocks behind.

                                                                                  Boro Hotel in Long Island City, New York | Remodelista

                                                                                  Above: A glimpse of the original concrete structure, the Comeback Sled Chair by Patricia Urquiola for Kartell, and a library shelf kitted out with volumes from Strand Books in New York City. The hotel's floors are laid with hand-scraped white oak flooring.

                                                                                  Boro Hotel Magazine Rack | Remodelista

                                                                                  Above: A magazine rack fashioned from white powder-coated plumbing pipes.

                                                                                  Boro Hotel Lounge Area | Remodelista

                                                                                  Above: A built-in sofa in the lounge area.

                                                                                  Boro Hotel in Long Island City, New York | Remodelista

                                                                                  Above: A bar built on layered cinderblocks with BluDot's Copper Real Good Barstools and Tom Dixon Cell Tall Pendant Lamps overhead.

                                                                                  Boro Hotel in Long Island City, New York | Remodelista

                                                                                  Above: A minimalist fire pit in the center of the hotel's lobby and lounge area.

                                                                                  Boro Hotel in Long Island City, New York | Remodelista

                                                                                  Above: Hallways to guest rooms are color-blocked with a stripe of gray-blue paint (a color that comes close is Farrow & Ball's Railings paint).

                                                                                  Boro Hotel in Long Island City, New York | Remodelista

                                                                                  Above: A custom bed with an upholstered headboard by Grzywinski & Pons, an Accordion Sconce from West Elm, a leather and oak Lean Chair by Add Interior, and the Jasper Morrison Cork Stool.

                                                                                  Boro Hotel in Long Island City, New York | Remodelista

                                                                                  Above: One wall of a guest room is lined with pallet wood wainscoting painted in a dusky sage green; a Bruno "C" Arm Desk Lamp by Robert Abbey sits atop a simple table.

                                                                                  Boro Hotel in Long Island City, New York | Remodelista

                                                                                  Above: A sweeping view of the New York City skyline from Queens.

                                                                                  Boro Hotel Bath | Remodelista

                                                                                  Above: A Tom Dixon Offcut stool in the generously sized bathrooms.

                                                                                  Boro Hotel Bathroom | Remodelista

                                                                                  Above: A tiled backsplash.

                                                                                  For more nearby design, visit our New York City guide and see our posts:

                                                                                  More Stories from Remodelista


                                                                                    0 0

                                                                                    On a quick trip upstate a couple of weeks ago, we dropped in on the newly opened Rivertown Lodge on Warren Street in Hudson, NY. Located in a 1920s movie house, the hotel (and soon to be dining spot) is the first venture of Ray Pirkle and Kim Bucci, two friends and hospitality veterans who work under the name Ramshackle Properties.

                                                                                    Rivertown Lodge solves the vexing neighborhood problem of where to stay on a visit upstate, beyond the usual hotels and Airbnb offerings, according to Ray, who relocated to Hudson a couple of years ago as a "full-time guy," as he says, drawn to the sense of community: "It's a different mentality." 

                                                                                    Ray's aim was to take a slower route when he approached the project, sourcing from within the community and working with collaborators such as Brooklyn-based Workstead. “We knew that we wanted color, and Workstead tends to love muted tone on tone, so we wanted to push that as far as possible," he says. "The idea for us was to stack color on color and pattern on pattern in a muted, diffused way.” The result? Vintage Danish furniture reupholstered in yellows, rusts, and greens; subtle patterns like houndstooth, tartan, and abstract prints from Zak + Fox; and the warmth of cherrywood in the shape of custom woodwork throughout the 27-room hotel.

                                                                                    Photography by Matthew Williams for Workstead, unless otherwise noted.

                                                                                    Rivertown Lodge in Hudson, New York by Workstead | Remodelista

                                                                                    Above: Custom log racks designed by Workstead and manufactured by Arrowhead flank a freestanding fireplace by Morsø. The furniture includes two lounge chairs of unknown origin, found on eBay and reupholstered in a custom, pale yellow fabric with houndstooth seats, a plywood table with leather feet by Tyler Hays's M. Crow and Company, and a pillow-covered settee, another vintage eBay find that was re-webbed and reupholstered.

                                                                                    Rivertown Lodge in Hudson, New York by Workstead | Remodelista

                                                                                    Above: The light-filled lobby is partially partitioned with cherrywood walls designed by Workstead and fabricated by woodworker Markus Bartenschlager. The handwoven garnet jute rug is from Naniquina's Vegetal collection.

                                                                                    Rivertown Lodge in Hudson, New York by Workstead | Remodelista

                                                                                    Above: A brass light fixture above the hotel's front desk was designed by Workstead and built by Markus Bartenschlager. Two stools from local studio Sawkille are among a few floating around the property.

                                                                                    Rivertown Lodge in Hudson, New York by Workstead | Remodelista

                                                                                    Above: The kitchen is located in the hotel's public space; breakfast is made in the mornings and dinner is served in the evenings (Rivertown Lodge is planning a menu of 12 to 14 small plates under Jean Adamson of Brooklyn's Vinegar Hill House starting in mid-December). The kitchen cabinets are painted a deep yellow and the countertops are burnished schist.

                                                                                    Rivertown Lodge in Hudson, New York by Workstead | Remodelista

                                                                                    Above: Ray, the former food and beverage director of Soho and Tribeca Grand Hotels, included a selection of Hudson-brewed craft beers on the bar menu. 

                                                                                    Rivertown Lodge in Hudson, New York by Workstead | Remodelista

                                                                                    Above: The bar is painted in Farrow & Ball's Tanner's Brown with cherrywood framing and the bar top ismade from a single piece of bronze. The stools are M. Crow and Company's Jack Stools, which were customized to bar height.

                                                                                    Rivertown Lodge in Hudson, New York by Workstead | Remodelista

                                                                                    Above: A custom chair by woodworker David Wright and a built-in cubby by Rowland Butler in the hotel's bridal suite.

                                                                                    Rivertown Lodge in Hudson, New York by Workstead | Remodelista

                                                                                    Above: A three-dimensional fibrous waffle textile by Hiroko Takeda hangs above an iron bed by Workstead.

                                                                                    Rivertown Lodge in Hudson, New York Photograph by Emma Tuccillo | Remodelista

                                                                                    Above: For the bathroom faucets, Workstead sourced classics from Chicago Faucets and stripped off the chrome to reveal the bare brass. The wood doorknob was left unfinished. Photograph by Emma Tuccillo for Rivertown Lodge. 

                                                                                    Rivertown Lodge in Hudson, New York by Workstead | Remodelista

                                                                                    Above: An armchair upholstered in Plus from Zak + Fox (each room has a Zak + Fox fabric upholstered chair) and a built-in bed in a corner cabin.

                                                                                    Rivertown Lodge in Hudson, New York Photograph by Emma Tuccillo | Remodelista

                                                                                    Above: Workstead's brass Orbit Sconce was custom made for Rivertown Lodge that the studio expanded into a full series.The cherrywood two-poster bed is also an original design by Workstead; it's finished with a matte Monocoat oil. Photograph by Emma Tuccillo for Rivertown Lodge.

                                                                                    Rivertown Lodge Porch in Hudson | Remodelista

                                                                                    Above: A screened-in porch area off one of the guestrooms.

                                                                                    Rivertown Lodge in Hudson, New York by Workstead | Remodelista

                                                                                    Above: An update to the original movie theater sign from 1928, Rivertown Lodge is located at 731 Warren St. in Hudson, New York.

                                                                                    For more on the designers, see our posts:

                                                                                    More Stories from Remodelista


                                                                                      0 0

                                                                                      Over the past eight years, Londoners have watched Fernandez & Wells grow from a small, heroic coffee shop with quality simple fare to an established family of eateries across the city. Throughout their expansion, Jorge Fernandez and Rick Wells have stayed true to their original intention: “To serve simple food of the best possible quality in spaces that are uncluttered and maintain the integrity of the buildings they occupy.”

                                                                                      With the recent launch of Rustic: Simple Food and Drink, from Morning to Night, the pair illuminate the converted—as well as the soon to be—to the beauty and elegance of their simple starter “business plan” of core products, which “consisted of a cardboard box of a bag of coffee, a slice of plain butter cake, a loaf of crusty sourdough bread, a salami, a hunk of English cheddar, and a bottle of wine.” Hungry for more? So are we. The book’s straightforward recipes and captivating images will satisfy your immediate urges and a visit will do even more.

                                                                                      Unless otherwise noted, photography by Helen Cathcart.

                                                                                      David Tremlett hand painted mural in Fernandez & Wells, Somerset House, Rustic, Photos by Helen Cathcart | Remodelista

                                                                                      Above: At the Somerset House location, Fernandez & Wells commissioned artist David Tremlett to create wall murals, which were made using pastel crayons rubbed directly onto the walls with the palm of the hand. "When we acquired the wonderful space at Somerset House in Autumn 2011, it occurred to me that the large white walls and high ceilings cried out for some color and I asked David, a friend and loyal customer, if he might oblige," Wells says. "As the lovely generous man he is, he did not one but three ‘wall drawings’ as he calls them, one in each of the rooms of the East Wing café."

                                                                                      Jars of preserves, sandwiches and bottles of wine on shelves, Rustic by Fernandez & Wells, Photography by Helen Cathcart | Remodelista

                                                                                      Above L: True to the Fernandez & Wells motto of "simple food and drink, from morning to night," the book's recipes and images are arranged by time of day. This image shows "teatime," where just about anything goes. Above R: There are about 30 wines—all European—on the Fernandez & Wells list. "While I am a huge fan of wines from all around the globe, the combination of tradition and innovation on our doorstep here in Britain means there's more than enough to excite the palate," Wells says. "European wines tend to be great food wines and they go particularly well with the simple, quality fare that we aim to serve."

                                                                                      Above: At Fernandez & Wells, they are big fans of toast—"a perfect foil for a multitude of spreads." Some of their favorites include Morcilla with Aioli, Ortiz Sardines with Unsalted Italian Butter, and Heritage Tomatoes with Garlic and Sea Salt.

                                                                                      Green chalkboard with daily specials, Glass bottles of water on shelf, Rustic by Fernandez & Wells, Somerset House, Photography by Helen Cathcart | Remodelista

                                                                                      Above L: Arched window shadows from the architecture of the 18th-century Somerset House move across the specials board. Above R: Bottles of water are stored and displayed on the fireplace mantle.

                                                                                      Portrait of Rick Wells and Jorge Fernandez, Rustic by Fernandez & Wells, Somerset House, Photography by Helen Cathcart | Remodelista

                                                                                      Above: The founders Rick Wells (left) and Jorge Fernandez (right). While working as a BBC World Service journalist, Wells met Fernandez at Monmouth Coffee—one of the few places to get "proper coffee" in London—where he was the manager 10 years ago. Over "shared enthusiasms," their partnership was formed.

                                                                                      Rustic by Fernandez & Wells, Somerset House, Photography by Helen Cathcart | Remodelista

                                                                                      Above L: The Artek High Chair by Alvar Aalto blend in with the tall and grand spaces of Somerset House. Above R: A Marrakechi Orange Cake awaits being served at afternoon tea. "Our cakes are not fancy and overly sweet," says Wells. "Instead, they are the sort of cake you could wrap in a napkin and put in your bag."

                                                                                      Rustic by Fernandez & Wells, Somerset House, Photography by Helen Cathcart | Remodelista

                                                                                      Above L: Warm from the oven, freshly baked Madeleines rarely stay on the counter for long. Above R: A graphic and packaging identity that is consistent with the original concept.

                                                                                      Rustic by Fernandez & Wells, Somerset House, Photography by Helen Cathcart | Remodelista

                                                                                      Above: With locations in Soho, Mayfair, South Kensington, and Aldwych, Fernandez & Wells has become a favorite meeting spot for Londoners.

                                                                                      Rustic by Fernandez & Wells | Remodelista

                                                                                      Above: Rustic: Simple Food and Drink, from Morning to Night is published by Hardie Grant; $25.82. In the UK, the book is available through Amazon; £13.60. Photograph by Christine Chang Hanway.

                                                                                      See Fernandez & Wells at Somerset House for more. Other noteworthy eating establishments in this area of London include Spring and The Delaunay.

                                                                                      Christine is also the writer of the new lifestyle and wellness blog My Contents Have Shifted—A Fabster's Musings on Being Fifty and Beyond.

                                                                                      More Stories from Remodelista


                                                                                        0 0

                                                                                        Last year independent bookstore McNally Jackson launched its latest venture: a shop devoted to rare prints, posters, framed original vintage book covers (Miss Lonely Hearts by Nathaniel West, for instance) and more. "We scour private collections, galleries, and institutions, and we work with individual artists to find work that would not usually enter into a retail environment; works made to be bought and sold outside of the traditional exhibition space or gallery system," says gallery director Sandeep Kaur Salter. In addition, Picture Room has a revolving art program, highlighting the work of individual artists; currently on view is a collection of risograph prints by Netherlands artist Sigrid Calon. Unframed prints start at $50; for more information, go to Picture Room.

                                                                                        Picture Room in Nolita, NY | Remodelista

                                                                                        Above: The Picture Room is next door to McNally Jackson's Goods for the Study, an office supply and paper goods shop that's also well worth a visit. 

                                                                                        Picture Room in Nolita, NY | Remodelista

                                                                                        Above: The shop is located in the heart of Nolita, on Mulberry Street.

                                                                                        Picture Room in Nolita, NYC | Remodelista

                                                                                        Above: Currently on view: work by Netherlands artist Sigrid Calon, whose brightly colored risograph prints are inspired by embroidery patterns. 

                                                                                        Picture Room in Nolita, NYC | Remodelista

                                                                                        Above: The whitewashed space is illuminated by classic lighting from Original BTC and Jielde wall lights.

                                                                                        Picture Room in Nolita, NY | Remodelista

                                                                                        Above: Framed vintage posters.

                                                                                        Picture Room in Nolita, NY | Remodelista

                                                                                        Above: A framed vintage cover of Franz Kafka's Amerika.

                                                                                        Another favorite source for well-priced art? See our post on Playtype in Copenhagen.

                                                                                        More Stories from Remodelista


                                                                                          0 0

                                                                                          Photographer Julia Spiess of the blog Dinners with Friends is German and, like me—a Northern California Brit—is not fully vested in the whole tradition of Thanksgiving. We make good guests and bring great side dishes, but the idea of cooking a turkey in November just seems wrong (to me, that's strictly a Christmas day affair). Looking for inspiration for a more laid-back approach to the day, we turned to Brit expat Maxine Gilbert, owner with her surfer/chef husband, John Gilbert, of the Parkside Cafe at Stinson Beach, half an hour north of SF (and accessed via a somewhat death-defying, winding panoramic road). The Parkside Cafe sits a stone's throw from the beach and includes a bakery, cafe, and snack bar, which John and Maxine have been running for the past 18 years. The restaurant is open on Thanksgiving, but the couple also manage to stage their own celebration. It's all about family, friends, and good food—just a little more casual than most.

                                                                                          So if you're looking for a change of pace, here are tips for a nontraditional celebration, courtesy of Maxine and John.

                                                                                          Photography by Julia Spiess for Dinners with Friends.

                                                                                          Parkside holiday table by Julia Spiess Dinners with Friends | Remodelista

                                                                                          Above: An Italian wood-burning stove anchors the dining room at the Parkside Cafe. It was installed by a couple of builders from nearby Bolinas. In lieu of traditional tiles, Maxine opted for a clean cement finish.

                                                                                          1. Entice the senses. John notes that the cafe, with its wood-burning stove, becomes all about “hearing, seeing, and smelling what’s going on in the hearth.” Even without a woodstove, some sort of fire adds atmosphere to a room.

                                                                                            Parkside holiday table photography by Julia Spiess Dinners with Friends | Remodelista

                                                                                          2. Keep the backdrop simple. Maxine explains, “Everything is either black or white, even the pots are all black. I wanted no artwork or color, just the food and bread to be the art.” The table is made from a slab of sycamore and positioned at the center of the room. The couple sourced the wood from Arborica, in West Marin; Maxine likes the dark streaks that run through it.

                                                                                          Use regular tumblers for both wine and water. The tumblers mean a smaller quantity of wine (good if you are looking to drink less) and they are not as obtrusive as traditional stemware.

                                                                                          Above: Maxine carries appetlizers—Dungeness crab on flatbread with fresh persimmon, celery, and shallot vinaigrette, and a tray of Point Reyes oysters.

                                                                                          3. Work with whatever is available. The couple are lucky to have great pickings in their area: "We get fish from a couple of guys in Bolinas before they head into the city to sell their catch. The greens are from Star Route or Gospel Flat, and we serve wine from Bolinas-based Sean Thackery

                                                                                          Parkside Holiday Table photography by Julia-Spiess | Remodelista

                                                                                          4. Consider two napkins. Layered napkins provide good contrast on the table, and if you're eating multiple courses, it's a nice luxury to have more than one. The Gilberts' napkins are shown here with Provençal Flatware by David Mellor. 

                                                                                          Parkside holiday table photography by Julia Spiess Dinners with Friends | Remodelista

                                                                                          Above: Maxine and John set their table with black ceramics from Heath's Coupe line and inexpensive Duralex tumblers, a longstanding bistro favorite.

                                                                                          5. Use black dinnerware. Food shows really well on dark plates.

                                                                                          6. Pour wine and water into glass tumblers. The Gilberts stick with classic Duralex bistroware from France. In addition to being nearly unbreakable and well-priced, these glasses are not as obtrusive on the table as traditional stemware (and their size keeps quantities sensible). For sources, see Object Lessons: Iconic Cafeware from Duralex.

                                                                                          Parkside Holiday Table photography by Julia-Spiess | Remodelista

                                                                                          Above: Levain fresh from the Parkside bakery.

                                                                                          7. Serve bread on a tea towel. John explains. "Linen is good for wrapping bread and keeping it warm and absorbing the heat moisture. Plus, it holds all the crumbs and looks so nice."

                                                                                          Parkside holiday table by Julia Spiess Dinners with Friends | Remodelista

                                                                                          Above: Food is set out on the counter beside the oven.

                                                                                          8. Serve food buffet style. It's communal, celebratory, and familial.

                                                                                          9. Clink a glass between courses. Taking a pause to toast and chat about the food creates a sense of occasion.

                                                                                          Parkside Holiday Table photography by Julia-Spiess | Remodelista

                                                                                          Above: Chestnuts and one of Louesa Roebuck's signature foraged arrangements.

                                                                                          10. Roast chestnuts. The crackle in the fire adds to the atmosphere. John uses an old recipe that calls for the chestnuts to be scored with an X at the top. He then boils them in salted water for six to 10 minutes until there's foam on top. He lets the chestnuts cool down, adds oil, salt, and pepper, and then puts them on the fire using a roaster with side air vents. 

                                                                                          Parkside holiday table by Julia Spiess Dinners with Friends | Remodelista

                                                                                          Above: In the oven, a pot of red curry squash puree sits ready to be served. The squash is from Gospel Flat Farm, in Bolinas.

                                                                                          Parkside holiday table photography by Julia Spiess Dinners with Friends | Remodelista

                                                                                          Above L: The accompaniment to the soup: seeded levain Gruèyere toast. Above R: Another staple of the Gilberts' dinners: olives warmed in the oven, served with unsalted butter sprinkled with a pinch of Maldon salt. Maxine concedes, "I know it's not local, but it really is the best salt."

                                                                                          Parkside holiday table by Julia Spiess Dinners with Friends | Remodelista

                                                                                          Above: Maxine enlisted Stinson local Louesa Roebuck to create the floral elements. Everything was foraged up the coast in West Marin; as Louesa explains, "The persimmon were the most glorious thing happening now and they provided the bone structure. I mixed autumnal hydrangea with pale, delicate lavender hydrangea, then added some clematis gone to seed that introduced a theatrical, fluffy, sensual note."

                                                                                          For more tips on holiday entertaining, see these posts: 

                                                                                          More Stories from Remodelista


                                                                                            0 0

                                                                                            The Pearl, an old San Antonio brewery deftly transformed into an entire neighborhood of restaurants, shops, and an outpost of the Culinary Institute of America, has just opened a place to stay. The 146-room Hotel Emma is the work of Roman and Williams, former set designers who have become masters of the historic conversion. Several years in the making, the quarters put original curiosities, such as fermentation tanks and a giant copper engine, to clever use. And there's an overall expansiveness and down-home grace that plants the place firmly in Texas.

                                                                                            Photography via Roman and Williams, except where noted.

                                                                                            The new Hotel Emma in a converted San Antonio brewery, designed by Roman and Williams | Remodelista

                                                                                            Above: Yes, this was once a brewery—and in operation until 2001. The eight-story structure was designed in 1898 by August Maritzen who ultimately had more than 80 breweries to his credit and is in the Second Empire style. Photograph via The Rivard Report.
                                                                                            Preserved brewery engine relic in the lobby of the new Hotel Emma in San Antonio designed by Roman and Williams. The hotel occupies a former brewery at The Pearl | Remodelista

                                                                                            Above: Roman and Williams say that in every project they "strive to find the tension between spontaneity and rigor, refinement and rebellion, and past and future." At the Emma, this translated into surprise details, such as an ammonia-powered copper engine preserved in the lobby. Photograph by Scott Martin via The Rivard Report.

                                                                                            Lobby at Hotel Emma, San Antonio, designed by Roman and Williams | Remodelista

                                                                                            Above: The vast concrete-tiled space is divided into intimate seating areas.

                                                                                            Hotel Emma lobby | Remodelista

                                                                                            Above: Roman and Williams preserved the decayed brick walls and framework ceiling while giving the space a grandeur. This being Texas, everything is outsized and upholstery is in saddle leather. Photograph by Craig Washburn via San Antonio Magazine.

                                                                                            Library at the new Hotel Emma in San Antonio designed by Roman and Williams | Remodelista

                                                                                            Above: There's even a two-tiered in-house library: The 3,700 volumes were acquired from local novelist and cultural anthropologist Sherry Kafka Wagner. Photograph by Scott Martin via The Rivard Report.

                                                                                            The new Hotel Emma Sternewirth bar in a converted San Antonio brewery, designed by Roman and Williams | Remodelista

                                                                                            Above: Brewery workers were allowed to imbibe on the job thanks to what was known as the Sternewirth privilege. Located in the building's great hall off the lobby, the Sternewirth bar and clubroom has 25-foot-tall ceilings and three fermentation tanks that Roman and Williams converted into lounges. Photograph by Scott Martin via The Rivard Report.

                                                                                            Sternewirth bar with fermentation tank lounge at the new Emma Hotel in San Antonio designed by Roman and Williams | Remodelista

                                                                                            Above: A closer look at a tank lounge with leather banquettes and metal paneling. Photograph by Scott Martin via The Rivard Report.

                                                                                            Sternewirth bar at the new Hotel Emma in San Antonio designed by Roman and Williams | Remodelista

                                                                                            Above: Wood and metal seating at the below-the-mezzanine bar. Upstairs books and beer bottles are on display. Photograph by Scott Martin via The Rivard Report.

                                                                                            The new Hotel Emma in a former San Antonio brewery designed by Roman & Williams | Remodelista

                                                                                            Above: Original archways and peeling walls have been preserved in the old brewhouse tower guest quarters. There are also rooms in a new wing.

                                                                                            The new Hotel Emma in a former San Antonio brewery designed by Roman & Williams | Remodelista

                                                                                            Above: A nice place to plant your hat.

                                                                                            A guest suite at the new Hotel Emma, San Antonio, designed by Roman and Williams | Remodelista

                                                                                            Above: Room to spare: The tall-ceilinged guest rooms have Herter Brother–inspired four posters.

                                                                                            A guest suite at the new Hotel Emma, San Antonio, designed by Roman and Williams | Remodelista

                                                                                            Above: White Frette linens are punched up with embroidered pillows. Note the built-in storage cupboard.

                                                                                            Old-fashioned bathroom at the new Hotel Emma, San Antonio, designed by Roman and Williams | Remodelista

                                                                                            Above Twin pedestal sinks in a blue-and-white tiled bath. The hotel's robes are seersucker made by Pearl's resident guayabera designer Caroline Matthews of Dos Carolinas.

                                                                                            Claw-footed bathtub at the new Hotel Emma, San Antonio, designed by Roman and Williams | Remodelista

                                                                                            Above: A preserved factory column alongside a new clawfoot tub.

                                                                                            South Texas provisions at the new Hotel Emma, San Antonio, designed by Roman and Williams | Remodelista

                                                                                            Above: Provisions from South Texas are sold in a hotel grocery called The Larder.

                                                                                            South Texas provisions at the new Hotel Emma, San Antonio, designed by Roman and Williams | Remodelista

                                                                                            Above: A Thanksgiving still life.

                                                                                            Restaurant at the new Hotel Emma in San Antonio designed by Roman and Williams | Remodelista

                                                                                            Above: Bentwood armchairs, wood banquettes, and old-fashioned pendant lights at Supper. Photograph by Scott Martin via The Rivard Report.

                                                                                            Tabetop at the new Hotel Emma, San Antonio, designed by Roman and Williams | Remodelista

                                                                                            Above: Food is a big emphasis: In addition to the bar, the Emma is home to a restaurant called Supper—John Brand is the chef—and has a team of culinary concierges on hand to guide guests.

                                                                                            For two more Roman and Williams designs in dramatic historic buildings, take a look at the Chicago Athletic Association Hotel and New York's High Line Hotel in Chelsea.

                                                                                            Hotel Emma is at 136 E. Grayson St., overlooking the San Antonio River and the northern end of the River Walk, a 15-mile promenade.

                                                                                            More Stories from Remodelista


                                                                                              0 0

                                                                                              In SF's most hipster neighborhood, the Mission District, a new bar aims to avoid design clichés. It's called ABV (Alcohol by Volume) and was opened by three restaurateurs with serious Bay Area cocktail creds (Beretta, Dalva, and Bourbon & Branch), along with a chef who hails from local favorites Bar Tartine and Commonwealth.

                                                                                              The stake they claimed is a former 75-seat sushi restaurant that has undergone a modest redesign—expanded drinking space, shrunken kitchen, and aesthetic updates. But before anyone picked up a hammer, the founders vowed that they would keep the interior trend-free: no Edison bulbs and reclaimed wood here. Their bar would be practical, comfortable, and affordable. As they told spirits blog Alcademics, "There's not going to be a uniform, and it's not like everyone is going to wear a certain kind of hat." 

                                                                                              ABV Cocktail Bar in San Francisco | Remodelista

                                                                                              Above: Hand-patinated wall mirrors and sconces hang opposite the bar. ABV aims to keep the drinks at under $10 each—and to make sure they're not so artisanal that they're gimmicky. Photograph by Patricia Chang via Eater SF.

                                                                                              ABV Cocktail Bar in San Francisco | Remodelista

                                                                                              Above: The bar counter is made from an elm tree that lived for more than a century on the campus of San Jose State University, south of San Francisco. Photograph by Patricia Chang via Eater SF.

                                                                                              ABV Cocktail Bar in San Francisco | Remodelista

                                                                                              Above L: At night, the mirrors and sconces have a warm sheen. Photograph by Pete Kane via SF Weekly. Above R: In daytime, they're a cool silver. Photograph by Patricia Chang via Eater SF.

                                                                                              Aged Mirrors at ABV Cocktail Bar in San Francisco | Remodelista

                                                                                              Above: Not much table space is required for food—the menu is all finger foods, and forks are not included. Hand-distressed mirrors and lamps give the space a glow. Photograph via ABV.

                                                                                              ABV Cocktail Bar in San Francisco | Remodelista

                                                                                              Above: Imbibers on the mezzanine have the best perch for people-watching. A pop art mural by SF artist Nathaniel Russell animates a swath of white wall (visit ABV's home page for a video of the design being painted). Photograph by Patricia Chang via Eater SF.

                                                                                              ABV Cocktail Bar in San Francisco | Remodelista

                                                                                              Above: A sound-absorbing black foam ceiling is visible from the mezzanine. Photograph by Patricia Chang via Eater SF.

                                                                                              Mural at ABV Cocktail Bar in San Francisco | Remodelista

                                                                                              Above: In the main lounge, the mural and a light fixture designed by owner Ryan Fitzgerald share center stage. Fitzgerald also designed ABV's tables, and the founding team of bartenders did much of the construction work themselves. Photograph via ABV.

                                                                                              ABV Cocktail Bar in San Francisco | Remodelista

                                                                                              Above: The facade got a dramatic redesign, including new street-level and clerestory windows to avoid the dungeon-style club look all too common in the neighborhood. A cafe table and chairs accommodate late lunchers (the bar is open from 2 p.m. to 2 a.m.). Go to ABV for more. Photograph by Patricia Chang via Eater SF.

                                                                                              Keep exploring dining in San Francisco: See The Mill: A "Bright and Messy" Cafe, New Restaurant Alert: Souvla, and Boulettes Larder Gets Brassy. For recommended hotels, shops, and garden finds, visit our San Francisco City Guide.

                                                                                              More Stories from Remodelista


                                                                                                0 0

                                                                                                When Sophie Mattiussi, owner of the Happy Guesthouse in Brussels, was converting a 1902 townhouse in the center of Brussels into her four-room bed-and-breakfast, she made the smart move of teaming up with two young local design firms. We love the bare-bones bedrooms that resulted. 

                                                                                                Photography by Charlotte Delval via Atelier Dynamo, unless noted.

                                                                                                Happy Guesthouse in Brussels designed by Julien Renault Objects and Atelier Dynamo | Remodelista

                                                                                                Above: The narrow building features a preserved Art Nouveau storefront, previously home to design company Emery & Cie, that now serves as the Happy Guesthouse gathering spot. 

                                                                                                Happy Guesthouse Living Room | Remodelista

                                                                                                Above: The interior has a light-filled Scandi vibe. Sophie, not coincidentally, earned a degree in interior architecture and worked as an event planner before becoming an innkeeper. She serves homemade breakfast at the table (fresh-squeezed watermelon juice and pastries from nearby Nectar & Co.) and advises her guests on what to see and do in the city. 

                                                                                                The Happy Guesthouse in Brussels via Atelier Dynamo, Charlotte Deval photo | Remodelista

                                                                                                Above: The shelves are stocked with a revolving array of art and design books and travel guides. (Sophie has a deal with the Taschen store down the street.)

                                                                                                Happy Guesthouse in Brussels, designed by Julien Renaul and Atelier Dynamo | Remodelista

                                                                                                Above: Sophie collaborated on the remodel with designer Julien Renault, who got his start working in the Bouroullec studio in Paris, and interior architects Atelier Dynamo. After many months of shoring up the structure, the team supplied it with clean, bright interiors and custom furnishings that salute Donald Judd. There's only one bedroom per floor. Photograph via Julien Renault Objects.

                                                                                                Minimalist bed frame at the Happy Guesthouse in Brussels | Remodelista

                                                                                                Above: The platform beds are composed of two elegantly intersecting framed rectangles. (It's too bad the cutouts are hidden by mattresses.) Note the strategically placed outlet.

                                                                                                Happy Guesthouse in Brussels designed by Julien Renault Objects and Atelier Dynamo | Remodelista

                                                                                                Above: The headboard doubles as a side table. Photograph via Julien Renault Objects.

                                                                                                Happy Guesthouse in Brussels designed by Julien Renault Objects and Atelier Dynamo | Remodelista

                                                                                                Above: Window shelves serve as desks with views of the street. 

                                                                                                Window shelf desk at the Happy Guesthouse in Brussels designed by Julien Renault Objects an Atelier Dynamo | Remodelista

                                                                                                Above: The shelves wrap around wall supports and are subtly angled. Photograph via Julien Renault Objects.

                                                                                                Happy Guesthouse Brussels bedside shelf/bench | Remodelista

                                                                                                Above: On some of the beds the platform extends out to form a long, low shelf. Photograph via Potato and Melk Blog.

                                                                                                Happy Guesthouse in Brussels | Remodelista

                                                                                                Above: The designers echoed the framed wood design in the bathroom. 

                                                                                                Framed wood bathroom mirror at the Happy Guesthouse in Brussels | Remodelista

                                                                                                Above: The bathrooms artfully make the most of compact space. Photograph via Venuez.

                                                                                                Happy Guesthouse in Brussels | Remodelista

                                                                                                 Above: For storage, rooms are fitted with built-in cupboards and narrow hanging rods. The guesthouse recently received the Commerce Design Brussels Award of 2015.

                                                                                                Happy Guesthouse in Brussels midcentury-style wall rack | Remodelista

                                                                                                Above: Multiple hanging options in two tones. Photograph via Potato and Melk Blog.

                                                                                                Happy Guesthouse Brussels attic room | Remodelista

                                                                                                Above: The attic room has its own balcony. Photograph via Potato and Melk Blog.

                                                                                                Happy Guesthouse in Brussels | Remodelista

                                                                                                Above: Happy Guesthouse is in the heart of the city (near the town hall and the Brussels Central Station) and surrounded by beauty. See more on Facebook (the inn's website still to come); reservations can be made through Booking.com. Photograph via New Places to Be.

                                                                                                Traveling to Belgium (even if just in spirit)? See our favorite shops, restaurants, and hotels in our Belgium City Guide, including a Surreal Antwerp B&B and Fashion's Favorite Fleuriste.

                                                                                                Go to 10 Easy Pieces for more wooden platform beds.

                                                                                                More Stories from Remodelista


                                                                                                  0 0

                                                                                                  We like the idea of spending the holidays at a world-class hotel (you deserve it when everything is going to pieces). We're obsessed with the Hôtel Providence in Paris's theater district; a newly opened hotel from restaurateur Pierre Moussié. 

                                                                                                  Modern eclecticism meets conspicuous glamour in the interiors. Elodie Moussié, wife of Pierre, designed the interiors with her best friend, Sophie Richard, who updated the 1854 brothel with House of Hackney wallpaper, printed velvet fabrics, antique lighting, and portrait paintings sourced from French country flea markets. Here's a look inside. 

                                                                                                  Hôtel Providence in Paris | Remodelista

                                                                                                  Above: Hôtel Providence is in the 10th Arrondissement, at 90 Rue René Boulanger.

                                                                                                  Above: A pair of velvet upholstered club chairs on the hotel's first floor.

                                                                                                  Hôtel Providence in Paris | Remodelista

                                                                                                  Above: A chinoiserie-style vase, an antique portrait, and glass pendant lights in the dining room.

                                                                                                  Hôtel Providence in Paris | Remodelista

                                                                                                  Above: Gold velvet upholstery on an antique sofa and stacks of fashion books.

                                                                                                  Hôtel Providence in Paris | Remodelista

                                                                                                  Above: Bar stools echo the floral prints of the walls in the bar and restaurant.

                                                                                                  Hôtel Providence in Paris | Remodelista

                                                                                                  Above: A dining room of floral wallpaper and classic Thonet Era Chairs.

                                                                                                  Hôtel Providence in Paris | Remodelista

                                                                                                  Above: The more minimalist Classic guest room in shades of azure.

                                                                                                  Hôtel Providence in Paris | Remodelista

                                                                                                  Above: A bath behind an Estraido glass partition.

                                                                                                  Hôtel Providence in Paris | Remodelista

                                                                                                  Above: A flea market find by Elodie and Sophie.

                                                                                                  Hôtel Providence in Paris | Remodelista

                                                                                                  Above: The Attic Suite is coated in Palmeral Wallpaper and fabric. A Palmeral De Beauvor Screen divides the lounge area from the bedroom.

                                                                                                  Hôtel Providence in Paris | Remodelista

                                                                                                  Above: Wallpaper extends to the mansard roof.

                                                                                                  Hôtel Providence in Paris | Remodelista

                                                                                                  Above: Busy print gives way to a serene en suite bath.

                                                                                                  Hôtel Providence in Paris | Remodelista

                                                                                                  Above: A clawfoot tub and marble tile in the bath.

                                                                                                  Hôtel Providence in Paris | Remodelista

                                                                                                  Above: Meh Meh Velvet Carpet Print wallpaper in the Mini Room and a Meh Meh Tilia Table Lampshade.

                                                                                                  Hôtel Providence in Paris | Remodelista

                                                                                                  Above: The Superior Bedroom with Haussmann-style windows and dark navy walls.

                                                                                                  Hôtel Providence in Paris | Remodelista

                                                                                                  Above L: Each room has a cocktail bar with mixing and measuring tools and a cocktail recipe book. Above R: A brass valet, Flights of Fancy Wallpaper in Pitch Blue, and Flights of Fancy Velvet Fabric lampshades.

                                                                                                  Hôtel Providence in Paris | Remodelista

                                                                                                  Above: A view from the attic suite onto the streets of the theater district.

                                                                                                  For more hotels in Paris, see our posts:

                                                                                                  More Stories from Remodelista


                                                                                                    0 0

                                                                                                    After years of sneaking in visits to see architecture on our family holidays, my sons are now onto us and wary of our ways. ("Do we really need to see another cathedral?)" Next trip, I’m going stealth with a ski vacation at Chesa Wazzau, a renovated 17th-century Engadine farmhouse in the Swiss mountain village of Bever. Restored and preserved with care by a husband-and-wife team (he’s a photographer and she’s an interior designer) who have owned the property for 30 years, the house maintains its original character and charm—vaulted ceilings, rustic wood framing, and windows embedded into thick walls. With all modern amenities included, my sons won’t even notice that they have skied back in time.

                                                                                                    Photography by Christian Küenzi.

                                                                                                    Chesa Wazzau Exterior | Remodelista

                                                                                                    Above: Above the entry at Chesa Wazzau, the sgraffito (Italian for "scratched") plaster decoration framing the small window embedded into a thick wall—a detail designed for heat retention—is typical of 17th-century Engadine architecture. 

                                                                                                    Chesa Wazzau in St. Moritz | Remodelista

                                                                                                    Above: In the kitchen the thick walls create a deep window sill ideal for the display of potted greenery. Modern kitchen cabinets provide a base for a granite trough sink.

                                                                                                    Chesa Wazza Kitchen Orange Door | Remodelista

                                                                                                    Above: "Much of the furniture was inherited," says owner Christian Küenzi. "Some pieces were already in the house and others have been with us for a lifetime."

                                                                                                    Chesa Wazzau in St. Moritz | Remodelista

                                                                                                    Above: Vaulted ceilings in one of the house's six bedrooms. It has two baths and sleeps 12.

                                                                                                    Chesa Wazzau Bedroom | Remodelista

                                                                                                    Above: The small walls embedded in thick walls do a respectable job of funneling light through the interior.

                                                                                                    Chesa Wazzau in St. Moritz | Remodelista

                                                                                                    Above: The vernacular wood furniture of the region contrasts with a Wagenfeld Bauhaus Table Lamp and glass side table.

                                                                                                    Chesa Wazzau in St. Moritz | Remodelista

                                                                                                    Above: The palette of rustic wood and white walls extends into the bathrooms.

                                                                                                    Chesa Wazzau Bedroom | Remodelista

                                                                                                    Above: A small bedroom with wood floors and ceilings has a balcony from which to take in the Alpine views.

                                                                                                    Chesa Wazza Bedroom | Remodelista

                                                                                                    Above: "It took many years of gentle and respectful renovation to create this idyll and retain the charm and originality of Chesa Wazzau," Küenzi says. "It's an ongoing process; there is always something to do.”

                                                                                                    Chesa Wazzau Exterior | Remodelista

                                                                                                    Above: The village buildings of Bever represent the vernacular architecture of the Engadine, a long valley in the Swiss Alps known for its sunny climate and proximity to St. Moritz—a five-minute drive. See Chesa Wazzau's location on the map below and go to the site for rental details.

                                                                                                    For more snowy idylls, explore:

                                                                                                    N.B.: This post is an update; the original story ran on December 22, 2014, as part of our Winter's Tale issue.

                                                                                                    More Stories from Remodelista


                                                                                                      0 0

                                                                                                      Here are a few things we love this week.  

                                                                                                      Kristin-lagerqvist-Elle-Decor-Sweden-remodelista-current-obsessions

                                                                                                      Marchi-Architects-Chestnuts-house-Remodelista-obsessions

                                                                                                      rodale-artisan-weaving-remodelista-obsessions

                                                                                                      dwell-hot-steel-rooms-remodelista-current-obsessions

                                                                                                      • Above: We're eyeing the industrial look of these spaces that incorporate hot-rolled steel. Photo by Adriene Williams.
                                                                                                      • An ode to brick
                                                                                                      • Over on Gardenista: A modern farmer and her 10 acres in Australia. 

                                                                                                      Instagram and Pinterest Picks of the Week

                                                                                                      mason-studio-instagram-remodelista-obsessions

                                                                                                      • Above: The intagram feed of Toronto-based design firm Mason marries art, design, and technology (@mason_studio).

                                                                                                      7115-by-szeki-pinterest-remodelista-obsessions

                                                                                                      • Above: 7115 by Szeki's Space board abounds with light-filled, airy spaces. 

                                                                                                      For more Remodelista, visit our most recent issue Winter's Light

                                                                                                      More Stories from Remodelista